From Astruc to Zimmerli: Old Testament Scholarship in Three Centuries

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Mohr Siebeck, 2007 - Religion - 265 pages
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In the humanities, if they are to remain alive, it is necessary to have a relationship to the thought as well as to the thinker from the past (Karl Rahner). Rudolf Smend attempts to establish such a relationship for one single branch of the humanities, which however can be seen as particularly paradigmatic. He does this in rough descriptions of 15 scholars who had a certain share in contributing to the history of Old Testament scholarship. He begins with the French physician Jean Astruc and the English Bishop Robert Lowth. Using the names for God, Astruc was the first to show that Genesis was based on various sources and manuscript traditions, and Lowth discovered the fundamental principle of Hebrew poetry (the parallelismus membrorum). At the end of the book the author discusses scholars whom he knew personally: Albrecht Alt, Gerhard v. Rad, Martin Noth, Isac Leo Seeligmann and Walther Zimmerli.
  

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Contents

Robert Lowth
15
Johann David Michaelis
30
Wilhelm Martin Leberecht de Wette
43
Wilhelm Gesenius
57
Abraham Kuenen
76
Julius Wellhausen
91
Hermann Gunkel
118
Albrecht Alt
132
Sigmund Mowinckel
157
Gerhard von Rad
170
Martin Noth
198
Isac Leo Seeligmann
212
WaltherZimmerli
235
List of Abbreviations
257
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Rudolf Smend, Geboren 1932; 1958 Promotion; 1962 Habilitation; 1963-65 Professor fur Altes Testament in Berlin, 1965-71 in Munster und seit 1971 in Gottingen; 1979 D.D. St. Andrews; 1979 Ehrenmitglied der Society for Old Testament Studies; Korrespondierendes Mitglied der British Academy, der Danischen, der Finnischen und der Norwegischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. 1986-92 Vizeprasident der DFG; 1994-2002 Vizeprasident bzw. Prasident der Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Gottingen.

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