Exhibition of Pictures Painted by Washington Allston: At Harding's Gallery, School Street (Google eBook)

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John H. Eastburn, Printer, 1839 - 8 pages
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Page 7 - How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica. Look, how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold; There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring...
Page 3 - And Elisha died, and they buried him. And the bands of the Moabites invaded the land at the coming in of the year. And it came to pass, as they were burying a man, that, behold, they spied a band of men ; and they cast the man into the sepulchre of Elisha : and when the man was let down, and touched the bones of Elisha. he revived, and stood up on his feet.
Page 4 - Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously ; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea.
Page 3 - ... terror. In the most prominent group above is a soldier, in the act of rushing from the scene. The violent and terrified action of this figure was chosen to illustrate the miracle, by the contrast which it exhibits to that habitual firmness supposed to belong to the military character, showing his emotion to proceed from no mortal cause. The figure grasping the soldier's arm, and pressing forward to look at the body, is expressive of terror, overcome by curiosity. The group on the left, or rather...
Page 7 - How pleasant and how sad the turning tide Of human life, when side by side The child and youth begin to glide Along the vale of years: The pure twin-being for a little space, With lightsome heart, and yet a graver face, Too young for woe, though not for tears.
Page 3 - ... partakes of the general impulse. The group on the right forms an episode, consisting of the wife and daughter of the reviving man.
Page 3 - Behind him, in a dark recess, are the bones of the prophet, the skull of which is peculiarized by a preternatural light. At his head and feet are two slaves, bearers of the body, the ropes still in their hands, by which they have let it down, indicating the act that moment performed ; the emotion...
Page 4 - The group on the right forms an episode, consisting of the wife and daughter of the reviving man. The wife, unable to withstand the conflicting emotions of the past and the present, has fainted, and whatever joy and astonishment may have been excited in the daughter by the sudden revival of her father, they are wholly absorbed in distress and solicitude for her mother. The young man, with outstretched arms, actuated by impulse (not motive), announces to the wife, by a sudden exclamation, the revival...
Page 7 - That seems from other worlds to plain; Thus falling, falling from afar, As if some melancholy star Had mingled with her light her sighs, And dropped them from the skies! "No, never came from aught below This melody of woe, That makes my heart to overflow, As from a thousand gushing springs, Unknown before; that with it brings This nameless light, if light it be...
Page 7 - POUR upon my soul again That sad, unearthly strain, That seems from other worlds to plain ; Thus falling, falling from afar, As if some melancholy star Had mingled with her light her sighs, And dropped them from the skies...

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