Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State

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U of Nebraska Press, 1979 - History - 424 pages
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First published in 1939 and never before available in a paperback edition, this remarkable compendium of Nebraskiana includes chapters on the state's history, natural setting, flora and fauna, Indians, government, agriculture and industry, ethnic groups, folklore, architecture, art, and literature. Far more than a tour guide, it is replete with all manner of colorful and unusual sidelights on Nebraska places and people, the kind of information not readily accessible outside of archives.

Tom Allan, veteran roving reporter for the Omaha World Herald, has written a new introduction which bridged the years between 1939 and 1979 an reveals some of his own off-the-beaten-path discoveries.

Rewarding reading for the armchair traveler and an indispensable companion for the tourist, Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State will delight and inform all those interested in Nebraska and the Great Plains region.

  

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Contents

Modern Nebraska
3
Lincoln
17
Agriculture and the Farmer
79
Transportation and Communication
90
Ethnic Elements
101
Education and Religion
114
Art and Music
120
27
127
Tours
235
Sioux City IowaSouth Sioux CityTekamah
257
Tour 1A OmahaBellevue 5 5 m state 31
277
Yankton S Dak NorfolkColumbusYork
287
Hot Springs S Dak ChadronAlliance
301
Missouri Valley IowaFremontGrand Island
325
TOUR 8A MaxwellFort McPherson National Cemetery
348
Sidney IowaNebraska CityLincolnGrand
360

The Press
133
Beatrice
147
Fremont
154
Grand Island
162
Hastings
169
Norfolk
205
North Platte
211
Omaha
219
Rockport Mo BrownvilleBeatriceFranklin
372
OgallalaOshkoshBridgeportScottsbluff
382
TOUR 12A BridgeportChimney RockGeringScotts Bluff
388
Junction with US 20PoncaNiobraraLynchButte
394
CHRONOLOGY
401
BIBLIOGRAPHY
407
INDEX
413
Copyright

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Page 410 - descending the upper part of the river in canoes, when their frail barks were overturned and all their powder spoiled. Their rifles being thus rendered useless, they were unable to procure food by hunting and had to depend upon roots and wild fruits for subsistence. After suffering extremely from hunger, they arrived at Laramie's Fork . . . about sixty miles above the cliffs.

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