Amusement Parks of Pennsylvania (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Stackpole Books, 2002 - Performing Arts - 212 pages
2 Reviews
Pennsylvania is home to many classic amusement parks, several of which began operating as early as the late nineteenth century. Some of these parks maintain rides and amusements from their early years, preserving an atmosphere of nostalgia. Others have evolved with new trends in the industry, adding high-tech rides and water parks. This book begins with a concise history of the amusement park, then surveys the industry in Pennsylvania. A comprehensive guide to 13 parks in the state and a selection of smaller ones, complete with information on rides and attractions, follows. Packed with vintage postcard images and photos.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ShawnMarie - LibraryThing

For anyone who lives in PA and loves amusement parks, this is the book to have. It is dated and some of the parks (at least one I know of - Williams Grove) are no longer in operation and the pricing ... Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
23
VI
43
VII
51
VIII
64
IX
79
X
93
XI
104
XIV
138
XV
152
XVI
159
XVII
171
XVIII
180
XIX
187
XX
199
XXI
203

XII
113
XIII
129

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Popular passages

Page 3 - Typically built at the end of the trolley lines, these resorts initially were simple operations consisting of picnic facilities, dance halls, restaurants, games, and a few amusement rides. These parks were immediately successful and soon opened across America.
Page 12 - California, many people were skeptical that an amusement park without any of the traditional attractions would succeed.
Page 12 - It seemed that these parks were becoming increasingly irrelevant, as the public turned elsewhere for entertainment. What was needed was a new concept to reignite the industry, and that new concept was Disneyland.

References to this book

About the author (2002)

Jim Futrell has worked as a marketing consultant for Kennywood Entertainment and Conneaut Lake Park and is the director and historian of the National Amusement Park Historical Association. A resident of Pittsburgh, he is the author of several articles on amusement parks and an avid collector of amusement park memorabilia.

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