Abridgement of Murray's English grammar: with an appendix, containing exercises in orthography, in parsing, in syntax, and in punctuation : designed for the younger classes of learners (Google eBook)

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Printed and sold by Russell Hubbard, 1809 - English language - 107 pages
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Page 57 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit...
Page 86 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen ; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 86 - If nothing more than purpose in thy power, Thy purpose firm is equal to the deed. Who does the best his circumstance allows, Does well, acts nobly; angels could no more.
Page 85 - Order is Heaven's first law; and this confest, Some are, and must be, greater than the rest, More rich, more wise; but who infers from hence That such are happier, shocks all common sense.
Page 88 - The spacious firmament on high, With all the blue ethereal sky, And spangled heavens, a shining frame, Their great original proclaim : Th' unwearied sun, from day to day, Does his Creator's power display, And publishes to every land The work of an Almighty hand.
Page 47 - A phrase is two or more words rightly put together, making sometimes part of a sentence, and sometimes a whole sentence. The principal parts of a simple sentence are, the subject, the attribute, and the object. The subject is the thing chiefly spoken of; the attribute is the thing or action affirmed or denied of it ; and the object is the thing affected by such action. The nominative denotes the subject, and usually goes before the verb or attribute ; and the word or phrase, denoting the object,...
Page 12 - AN Article is a word prefixed to substantives, to point them out, and to show how far their signification extends ; as, a garden, an eagle, the woman.
Page 86 - Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife Their sober wishes never learn'd to stray; Along the cool sequester'd vale of life They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.
Page 10 - A word of one syllable is termed a monosyllable ; a word of two syllables, a dissyllable ; a word of three syllables, a trisyllable ; and a word of four or more syllables, a polysyllable. A primitive word is that which cannot be reduced to any simpler word in the language ; as, man, good, content.
Page 12 - A or an is styled the indefinite article : it is used in a vague sense, to point out one single thing of the kind, in other respects indeterminate : as, " Give me a book;" .

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