London Journal of Botany, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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H. Baillière., 1842 - Botany
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In a university library, buried between the covers of William Hooker's London Journal of Botany, is a treasure wrapped in canvas, lost, waiting to be discovered. The treasure is Robert Heward's 1842 Biographical Sketch of the Late Allan Cunningham (1791-1839). Allan Cunningham was a Botanist and Explorer, a botanical warrior, who played an important role in Colonial Australia's history. Although Heward's 19th century, scholarly writing style is stiff and formal, typical of the period, it was written with obvious respect and affection. Mr Heward was a close friend of Allan Cunningham. His description of Mr Cunningham's strength of character was so moving that tears fell as I read his closing words. His story is worth discovering. http://www.artuccino.com/Allan_Cunningham/Robert_Heward/index.html 

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Page 214 - Locust-tree (Robinia Pseudacacia) decidedly indigenous. It probably extends to the southern confines of Pennsylvania ; and from this point south it is everywhere abundant, but we did not meet with it east of the Blue Ridge.
Page 268 - I pity the man who can travel from Dan. to Beersheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren and so it is; and so is all the world to him, who will not cultivate the fruits it offers.
Page 106 - ... between the parallels of 26° and 27°, and that the main ranges which separate the coast waters from those that flow inland continue to the north in one unbroken chain, as far as the eye could discern from a commanding station, near my most distant encampment up the river, and present no opening or hollow part in their elevated ridge through which to admit of a road being made to the interior beyond them.
Page 121 - AC) and the branches, which resemble those of the palm tree in their growth, fall off every year, leaving an indentation on the trunk. The leaves of these branches, which are twelve in number, are much like the heath fern, from whence this tree obtained the name of the fern-tree. The middle of the tree, from the root to the apex, consists of a white substance resembling a yam, and when boiled it tastes like a bad turnip; this the hogs feed on very eagerly; the outside of the trunk is hard wood, and...
Page 570 - It was a resurrection in miniature ; but the immutable laws prescribed to living beings were my directors.* At the voice of comparative anatomy, each bone, each fragment, regained its place. I have no expressions to describe the pleasure experienced, in perceiving that as I discovered one character, all the consequences more or less foreseen of this character, were successively developed. The feet were conformable to what the...
Page 215 - Fields and waste ground. Jefferson : abundant especially near Charlestown, where there are many fields absolutely blue with the plant. Dr. Gray says of his trip through this country: "From the moment we entered the valley, we observed such immense quantities of Echium vulgare, that we were no longer surprised at the doubt expressed by Pursh whether it were really an introduced plant;" near Shenandoah Junction ; Shepherdstown and Harper's Ferry.
Page 9 - Indian graves are extremely numerous about St. Louis, though none are found in the immediate vicinity of the town : they are most frequent on the hills about the Merameg and on the north side of the Missouri. On the 12th June, Mr. Say and Mr. Peale, accompanied by one man, descended the Mississippi, in a small boat to the mouth of the Merameg, and ascended the latter river about fifteen miles, to a place where great numbers of graves have been explored, and have been represented to contain the bones...
Page 293 - TUlandsia, that inhabits abundantly an arid rocky part of the mountain, at an elevation of about 5,000 feet above the level of the sea. Besides the ordinary method by seed, it propagates itself by runners, which it throws out from the base of the...
Page 215 - ... along the road-sides of the northern States; but here, for the distance of more than a hundred miles, it has taken complete possession, even of many cultivated fields, especially where the limestone approaches the surface, presenting a broad expanse of brilliant blue. It is surprising that the farmers should allow a biennial like this so completely to overrun their land. Another plant, much more extensively introduced here than in the north, (where it scarcely deserves the name of a naturalised...
Page 570 - I was in the situation of a man who had given to him, pels mele, the mutilated and incomplete fragments of a hundred skeletons, belonging to twenty sorts of animals ; and it was required that each bone should be joined to that which it belonged to.

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