How we know what isn't so: the fallibility of human reason in everyday life

Front Cover
Free Press, Mar 5, 1993 - Philosophy - 216 pages
36 Reviews
Gilovich illustrates his points with vivid examples and supports them with the latest research findings in a wise and readable guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
15
4 stars
16
3 stars
4
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

User Review  - Todd Martin - Goodreads

“People will always prefer black-and-white over shades of grey, and so there will always be the temptation to hold overly-simplified beliefs and to hold them with excessive confidence.” - Thomas ... Read full review

Review: How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

User Review  - Nancy - Goodreads

Seriously, a must read! Read full review

Contents

PART
7
PART
73
PART THREE
123
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1993)

Thomas Gilovich is a professor of psychology at Cornell University and author of How We Know What Isn't So. He lives in Ithaca, New York.

Bibliographic information