How we know what isn't so: the fallibility of human reason in everyday life

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Free Press, Mar 5, 1993 - Philosophy - 216 pages
39 Reviews
Gilovich illustrates his points with vivid examples and supports them with the latest research findings in a wise and readable guide to the fallacy of the obvious in everyday life.

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Review: How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

User Review  - Nancy - Goodreads

Seriously, a must read! Read full review

Review: How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life

User Review  - Dave Peticolas - Goodreads

A lay introduction to recent research into the way human beings reason in ordinary situations and how our reasonings diverge from standard models of logic and probability. Read full review

Contents

PART
7
PART
73
PART THREE
123
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Thomas Gilovich is a professor of psychology at Cornell University and author of How We Know What Isn't So. He lives in Ithaca, New York.

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