Lessons in English grammar (Google eBook)

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Silver, Burdett, 1893 - English language - 240 pages
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Page 172 - of all I survey of the fowl and the brute 5. That orbed maiden with white fire laden, Whom mortals call the moon, Glides glimmering o'er my fleece-like floor, By the midnight breezes strewn. Analysis. A complex declarative sentence. (1) maiden subject. (2)
Page 215 - The quotation retains its own punctuation (c): (a) " Leaves have their time to fall, And flowers to wither at the north wind's breath, And stars to set; but all Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death.
Page 151 - exclamative: How poor, how rich, how abject, how august, How complicate, how wonderful is man ! Generally it partakes of the interrogative form, and is introduced by who, what, or how : Who would have thought it! What a piece of work is man!
Page 172 - heard that the train had started, when performs two offices, a connective and an adverbial modifier. It connects telegraphed and heard, and modifies telegraphed. The clauses are analyzed as sentences: the connectives are when, before, at, to. 4. I am monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute; From the center all round to the sea, I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Page 185 - strictness is sought to be preserved by the use of he or she, but this is felt to be cumbersome: The institution of property, reduced to its essential elements, consists in the recognition, in each person, of a right to the exclusive disposal of what he or she has produced by their own exertions.
Page 163 - test. (3) Ores are natural compounds, being produced by nature. (4) He, a professed Catholic, imprisoned the Pope. (5) Of all our senses, sight is the most perfect. (6) Her crystal lamp the evening star has lighted. (7) On the fifth day of the moon, which, according to the custom of my forefathers, I always keep holy. (8) The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound bucket, the
Page 177 - 22. That orbed maiden with white fire laden, Whom mortals call the moon, Glides glimmering o'er my fleece-like floor, By the midnight breezes strewn.
Page 198 - sir, they are not angry -with one another; they have no cause of quarrel, but their country thinks that there should be a pause. Hence, to emphasize the grammatical subject unusually, it must be removed from its usual place. This is true likewise of the grammatical predicate: (1) Blessed are the peace-makers. (2) Sad and
Page 224 - sting? O Grave, where is thy victory? Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O Union, strong and great I
Page 172 - My right there is none to dispute; From the center all round to the sea, I am lord of the fowl and the brute.

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