Wordsworth to Dobell (Google eBook)

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Thomas Humphry Ward
Macmillan and Company, 1884
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Page 457 - Homer ruled as his demesne : Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: — Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific — and all his men Look'd at each other with a wild surmise — Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
Page 28 - SHE dwelt among the untrodden ways Beside the springs of Dove, A Maid whom there were none to praise And very few to love. A violet by a mossy stone Half hidden from the eye ! — Fair as a star, when only one Is shining in the sky. She lived unknown, and few could know When Lucy ceased to be; But she is in her grave, and, oh, The difference to me...
Page 324 - NOT a drum was heard, not a funeral note, As his corse to the rampart we hurried ; Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot O'er the grave where our hero we buried. We buried him darkly at dead of night, The sods with our bayonets turning ; By the struggling moonbeam's misty light, And the lantern dimly burning.
Page 453 - Who are these coming to the sacrifice ? To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, And all her silken flanks with garlands drest?
Page 60 - Forebode not any severing of our loves ! Yet in my heart of hearts I feel your might ; I only have relinquished one delight To live beneath your more habitual sway, I love the Brooks, which down their channels fret, Even more than when I tripped lightly as they: The innocent brightness of a new-born Day Is lovely yet ; The Clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take a sober colouring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality ; Another race hath been, and other palms are won.
Page 452 - Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone: Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare ; Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal — yet do not grieve: She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss; For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!
Page 324 - Lightly they'll talk of the spirit that's gone, And o'er his cold ashes upbraid him — But little he'll reck, if they let him sleep on In the grave where a Briton has laid him. But half of our heavy task was done When the clock struck the hour for retiring; And we heard the distant and random gun That the foe was sullenly firing. Slowly and sadly we laid him down, From the field of his fame fresh and gory; We carved not a line, and we raised not a stone, But we left him alone with his glory.
Page 451 - Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! No hungry generations tread thee down; The voice I hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown: Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Through the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home, She stood in tears amid the alien corn; The same that oft-times hath Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.
Page 19 - To them I may have owed another gift, Of aspect more Sublime ; that blessed mood, In which the burthen of the mystery, In which the heavy and the weary weight Of all this unintelligible world, Is lightened : — that serene and blessed mood, In which the affections gently lead us on. — Until, the breath of this corporeal frame And even the motion of our human blood Almost suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul : While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony, and...
Page 21 - All thinking things, all objects of all thought, And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods, And mountains ; and of all that we behold From this green earth ; of all the mighty world Of eye, and ear, — both what they half create, And what perceive ; well pleased to recognise In nature and the language of the sense, The anchor of my purest thoughts, the nurse, The guide, the guardian of my heart, and soul Of all my moral being.

References from web pages

Thomas Humphry Ward, The English Poets
Thomas Humphry Ward, The English Poets. Selections with Critical Introductions by Various Writers and a General Introdction by Matthew Arnold. ...
www.english.ucsb.edu/ faculty/ rraley/ research/ anthologies/ Ward.html

JSTOR: The English Poets
The English Poets. blg. The American Journal of Philology, Vol. 2, No. ... The English Poets. Edited by th WARD. Vol. III. Addison to Blake. Vol. IV. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0002-9475(1881)2%3A5%3C105%3ATEP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-5

Internet Archive: Details: The English Poets Vol IV
The English Poets Vol IV (1919). The English Poets Vol IV (1919). Author: Arnold, Matthew Book Contributor: Osmania University Language: English ...
www.archive.org/ details/ englishpoetsvoli031936mbp

William R. mckelvy - In the Valley of the Shadow of Books ...
Matthew Arnold suggested part of our challenge when he announced in his general introduction to The English Poets (1880) that "the future of poetry is ...
muse.jhu.edu/ journals/ victorian_poetry/ v041/ 41.4mckelvy.html

Commentary: Edmund Gosse on Thomas Love Peacock
Edmund Gosse, in The English Poets: Selections with Critical Introductions, ed. Thomas Humphry Ward (1880) 4:417-19. navigate ...
198.82.142.160/ spenser/ CommentRecord.php?action=GET& cmmtid=6503

Arnold, Matthew
The first essay in the 1888 volume, “The Study of Poetry,” was originally published as the general introduction to th Ward's anthology, The English Poets ...
edit.britannica.com/ getEditableToc?tocId=415

Matthew Arnold A Bibliography
Introduction to Keats in The English Poets, ed. Thomas Humphrey Ward. London: Macmillan and Co., 1880. 4: 428-37. Page 4 of 8. Matthew Arnold: abibliography ...
www.tejones.net/ religion/ BroadChurch/ Biblio/ MA.pdf

IV. Matthew Arnold, Arthur Hugh Clough, James Thomson ...
The English Poets. Selections and Introductions by Ward, th 1880. The Natural Truth of Christianity. Selections from the Select Discourses of John Smith, ...
www.bartleby.com/ 223/ 0400.html

Matthew Arnold
In October 1878, T. Humphrey Ward, the husband of Arnold's niece Mary. proposed that Arnold work with him on his anthology entitled The English Poets. ...
www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o& se=gglsc& d=5000673656

Intrinsic earthliness: science, materialism, and The Fleshly
Despite the authoritative and ostensibly impartial format of Ward's The English Poets, Pater's introductory essay on Rossetti, which appeared in late 1883 ...
www.encyclopedia.com/ doc/ 1G1-100508562.html

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