The First Professional Scientist: Robert Hooke and the Royal Society of London (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 29, 2009 - Science - 300 pages
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A contemporary of Christopher Wren, Robert Boyle, and Isaac Newton, and close friend of all but Newton, Robert Hooke (1635-1703), one of the founders of the early scientific revolution, faded into almost complete obscurity after his death and remained there for nearly three centuries. The result has been that his role in the scientific revolution has been almost totally ignored. He was the first professional scientist worthy of the name, working for the young Royal Society of London as its curator of experiments for four decades. He became the Society’s intellectual center, and for a while its Secretary, roles which led to confrontation with Newton. He made important contributions to pneumatics, mechanics, microscopy, astronomy, and geology, and was partner to Wren in rebuilding London after the Fire.
  

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Contents

Restoring Robert Hooke
1
Hooke and London
4
Annotations
8
Robert Hooke Indefaticable Genius Hooke and London
13
The Diary
18
Hooke and Wren
22
Conclusion
24
Annotations
25
Hookes Natural Philosophy
150
Light Matter and Motion
153
Natural Philosophy and Newton
157
Conclusion
159
Annotations
160
The System of the World Hooke and Universal Gravitation the Inversesquare Law and Planetary Orbits
164
Halley and Newton
171
Huygens
173

Promoting PhysicoMathematicalExperimental Learning Founding the Royal Society of London
32
Annotations
39
Society of the Muses The First Decade
45
The Laws of Motion
53
Concluding the First Decade
56
Annotations
58
Crisis and Consolidation 16721687
65
Annotations
69
The Society After the Principia 16881703
72
Annotations
77
Scientific Virtuoso Hooke 16551687
81
Hooke and the Royal Society 16621677
84
Hooke and Oldenburg 16751677
91
Hooke and the Society after Oldenburg 16771687
98
Hooke as Scientist
101
The Hooke Folio 2006
114
Micrographia
115
Annotations
118
And All Was Light Hooke and Newton on Light and Color
135
Hookes Theory of Light
137
Newtons Theory
139
Debate after 1672
140
Annotations
144
The Nature of Things Themselves Robert Hooke Natural Philosopher
149
Hooke and Universal Gravitation
174
Hooke and Newton 1679
177
Hookes Laws of Circular Motion
182
Newton Gravitation and the Kepler Problem 16651987
187
Conclusion
189
Annotations
190
The Omnipotence of the Creator Robert Hooke Astronomer
203
Telescopes and Optics
205
Hooke As An Observer
207
Comets
214
Stellar Parallax
216
Conclusion
220
The Last Remain Hooke After the Principia 16871703
227
Hooke and Newton
229
16871703
231
Annotations
237
Epilogue
241
Legacy
243
Conclusion
247
Annotations
248
Bibliography
251
Index
265
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