Select specimens of English prose [ed.] by E. Hughes (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Edward Hughes
1853
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Contents

The Calamities of Authors
304
Fable of the Seven Sleepers
305
The Spirit of Exaggeration
307
The Three Black Crows
309
On Cruelty to the Brute Creation
310
The Children in the Wood
311
Franklins Visit to his Mother
315
Young Birds taking Wing
319
The Solitary Reaper
321
On Cruelty to Animals
322
The Selfish Man
323
Reflections on Autumn
324
The Fall of the Leaf
325
Christmas withindoors in the North of Germany
326
The Lord helpeth Man and Beast
328
The Place of Tassos confinement
329
On the Love of Country
330
The Patriots Prayer for England
331
On the Miseries of War
332
The Vision of Mirza
334
The Power of Music
338
The Life of a Monkey
339
London Fog and the Court of Chancery
341
Lamentation on the Death of a Son Page 332 334 338 330
345
The renowned Wouter Van Twiller
346
The Effects of the Weather on the Temper
348
The Glory of Poetry
351
My Heart leaps up when I be hold 32 The influence of the Body on the Mind
352
Joy over one Sinner
355
The Love of Life
356
The Dignity of Age
357
Sorrow for the Dead
358
Reminiscence 313 361 lb 351 356 357 368
360
The Use of the Senses
361
The Nature and Objects of Phy
367
Language
373
Objections to the study of Poli
380
The Introduction of ihe Potato
388
Strikes among Men and Masters
394
SECTION VII
428
An Exposition of the Tenth
436
The Ways of God
448
The Voice of Nature to Man
454
Days among the Dead
461
Speculations of Futurity 469 Importance of a dne regulation
491
Advice of a Father to his Son 476 Necessity of Regularity in Busi
498
Mine own Fireside 490 A general Thanksgiving
504

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Page 403 - Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds ; pleasant the sun When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glist'ring with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers ; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild ; then silent night With this her solemn bird and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train...
Page 502 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God ; her voice the harmony of the world. All things in heaven and earth do her homage ; the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power.
Page 504 - We bless thee for our creation, preservation, and all the blessings of this life ; but above all, for thine inestimable love in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ ; for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.
Page 439 - Marvel not at this: for the hour is coming, in the which all that are in their graves shall hear the voice of the Son of God, and shall come forth : they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life, and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation,
Page 395 - SOCIETY is indeed a contract. Subordinate contracts for objects of mere occasional interest may be dissolved at pleasure but the State ought not to be considered as nothing better than a partnership agreement in a trade of pepper and coffee, calico or tobacco, or some other such low concern, to be taken up for a little temporary interest, and to be dissolved by the fancy of the parties.
Page 321 - Reaper Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; 0 listen! for the Vale profound Is overflowing with the sound.
Page 395 - Each contract of each particular state is but a clause in the great primeval contract of eternal society, linking the lower with the higher natures, connecting the visible and invisible world, according to a fixed compact, sanctioned by the inviolable oath, which holds all physical and all moral natures, each in their appointed place.
Page 149 - It is not to be thought of that the flood Of British freedom, which, to the open sea Of the world's praise, from dark antiquity Hath flowed, " with pomp of waters, unwithstood...
Page 341 - Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets as if the waters had but newly retired from the face of the earth, and it would not be wonderful to meet a Megalosaurus, forty feet long or so, waddling like an elephantine lizard up Holborn Hill. Smoke lowering down from chimney-pots, making a soft black drizzle, with flakes of soot in it as big as full-grown snow-flakes gone into mourning, one might imagine, for the death of the sun.
Page 236 - It was not in the battle; No tempest gave the shock; She sprang no fatal leak; She ran upon no rock. His sword was in its sheath; His fingers held the pen, When Kempenfelt went down With twice four hundred men. Weigh the vessel up, Once dreaded by our foes ! And mingle with our cup The tears that England owes. Her timbers yet are sound, And she may float again Full charged with England's thunder, And plough the distant main. But Kempenfelt is gone, His victories are o'er; And he and his eight hundred...

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