Social Value: A Study in Economic Theory, Critical and Constructive (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin, 1911 - Value - 204 pages
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Page 138 - The laws and conditions of the production of wealth, partake of the character of physical truths.
Page 66 - Ah, sir, a distinct universe walks about under your hat and under mine all things in nature are different to each the woman we look at has not the same features, the dish we eat from has not the same taste to the one and the other you and I are but a pair of infinite isolations, with some fellow-islands a little more or less near to us.
Page 138 - The distribution of wealth, therefore, depends on the laws and customs of society. The rules by which it is determined, are what the opinions and feelings of the ruling portion of the community make them, and are very different in different ages and countries; and might be still more different, if mankind so chose.
Page 137 - the power an article confers upon its possessor irrespective of legal authority or personal sentiments, of commanding, in exchange for itself, the labor, or the products of the labor, of others.
Page 138 - It is not so with the Distribution of Wealth. That is a matter of human institution solely. The things once there, mankind, individually or collectively, can do with them as they like.
Page 65 - No one can compare and measure accurately against one another even his own mental states at different times: and no one can measure the mental states of another at all except indirectly and conjecturally by their effects.
Page 138 - ... interfere en masse, or employ and pay people for the purpose of preventing him from being disturbed in the possession. The distribution of wealth, therefore, depends on the laws and customs of society. The rules by which it is determined, are what the opinions and feelings of the ruling portion of...
Page 81 - The unity of the social mind consists not in agreement but in organization, in the fact of reciprocal influence or causation among its parts, by virtue of which everything that takes place in it is connected with everything else, and so is an outcome of the whole...
Page viii - ... a committee composed of Professor J. Laurence Laughlin, University of Chicago, Chairman Professor JB Clark, Columbia University Professor Henry C. Adams, University of Michigan Horace White, Esq., New York City, and Professor Edwin F.
Page 66 - ... balance, and no commensurability, between the laborer's disutility (pain) in producing the goods and the consumer's utility (pleasure) in consuming them, inasmuch as these two hedonistic phenomena lie each within the consciousness of a distinct person. There is, in fact, no continuity of nervous tissue over the interval between consumer and producer, and a direct comparison, equilibrium, equality, or discrepancy in respect of pleasure and pain can, of course, not be sought except within each...

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