A History of the Clan Mac Lean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle, in the Isle of Mull, to the Present Period (Google eBook)

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R. Clarke & Company, 1889 - 460 pages
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Page 254 - Though my perishing ranks should be strewed in their gore, Like ocean-weeds heaped on the surf-beaten shore, Lochiel, untainted by flight or by chains, While the kindling of life in his bosom remains, Shall victor exult, or in death be laid low, With his back to the field, and his feet to the foe ! And leaving in battle no blot on his name, Look proudly to heaven from the death-bed of fame.
Page 439 - said Glenara the stern. " And tell me, I charge you, ye clan of my spouse ! Why fold ye your mantles, why cloud ye your brows?" So spake the rude chieftain. No answer is made, But each mantle unfolding, a dagger display'd. " I dreamt of my lady, I dreamt of her shroud," Cried a voice from the kinsmen, all wrathful and loud; " And empty that shroud and that coffin did seem.
Page 423 - The lamb from the braken, and doe from the glen, The salt sea we'll harry, and bring to our Charlie The cream from the bothy and curd from the pen.
Page 439 - Tis the chief of Glenara laments for his dear ; And her sire, and the people, are call'd to her bier. Glenara came first, with the mourners and shroud ; Her kinsmen they follow'd, but mourn'd not aloud: Their plaids all their bosoms were folded around ; They march'd all in silence, they look'd on the ground. In silence they reach'd, over mountain and moor, To a heath where the oak-tree grew lonely and hoar ; " Now here let us place the grey stone of her cairn ; Why speak ye no word?
Page 373 - Lieutenants Francis and Allan Maclean of the brigade were taken prisoners, and carried before General Lowendahl, who thus addressed them : ' Gentlemen, consider yourselves on parole. If all had conducted themselves as you and your brave corps have done, I should not now be master of Bergen-op-Zoom.
Page 439 - Cried a voice from the kinsmen, all wrathful and loud ; " And empty that shroud and that coffin did seem : Glenara ! Glenara ! now read me my dream !" O ! pale grew the cheek of that chieftain, I ween, When the shroud was unclosed, and no lady was seen; When a voice from the kinsmen spoke louder in scorn, 'Twas the youth who had loved the fair Ellen of Lorn: " I dreamt of my lady, I dreamt of her grief, I dreamt that her lord was a barbarous chief: On a rock of the ocean fair Ellen did seem ; Glenara...
Page 439 - Tis the chief of Glenara, laments for his dear ; And her sire and her people are called to her bier. Glenara came first, with the mourners and shroud ; Her kinsmen they followed, but mourned not aloud ; Their plaids all their bosoms were folded around ; They marched all in silence they looked to the ground.
Page 55 - To attach to his interest the principal chiefs of these provinces, to overawe and subdue the petty princes who affected independence, to carry into their territories, hitherto too exclusively governed by their own capricious or tyrannical institutions, the same system of a severe, but regular and rapid administration of civil and criminal justice, which had been established in his Lowland dominions, was the laudable object of the king ; and for this purpose he succeeded, with that energy and activity...
Page 63 - French officers who were with him attempted by entreaties and blows to restrain them; they .neither understood their language nor cared for their violence, but threw themselves sword in hand upon the English. They found, however, an enemy in Sir Edward Stanley, whose coolness was not to be surprised in this manner. The squares of English pikemen stood to their ground ; and although for a moment the shock of the mountaineers was terrible, its force once sustained became spent with its own violence,...
Page 412 - With flashing eye and burning brow, The mother followed, heedless how, O'er crags with mosses overgrown, And stair-like juts of slippery stone. But midway up the rugged steep, She found a chasm she could not leap; And kneeling on its brink, she raised Her supplicating hands, and gazed. "0, spare my child, my joy, my pride! 0, give me back my child!" she cried: "My child! my child!" with sobs and tears, She shrieked upon his callous ears. "Come, Evan...

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