The Poetical Works of Akenside and Beattie: With a Memoir of Each ... (Google eBook)

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1880
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Page 10 - O, how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven, O, how canst thou renounce^ and hope to be forgiven ! These charms shall work thy soul's eternal health, And love, and gentleness, and joy,...
Page 136 - Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, and bade the father of his country 'hail! for lo! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, and Rome again is free!
Page xviii - Not long ago I began a poem in the style and stanza of Spenser, in which I propose to give full scope to my inclination, and be either droll or pathetic, descriptive or sentimental, tender or satirical, as the humour strikes me; for, if I mistake not, the measure which I have adopted admits equally of all these kinds of composition.
Page 186 - Each passing Hour sheds tribute from her wings ; And still new beauties meet his lonely walk, And loves unfelt attract him. Not a breeze Flies o'er the meadow, not a cloud imbibes The setting sun's effulgence, not a strain From all the tenants of the warbling shade Ascends, but whence his bosom can partake Fresh pleasure, unreprov'd.
Page 125 - Tired of earth And this diurnal scene, she springs aloft Through fields of air, pursues the flying storm, Rides on the vollied lightning through the heavens ; Or, yoked with whirlwinds, and the northern blast, Sweeps the long tract of day.
Page 135 - Mind, mind alone, (bear witness, Earth and Heaven !) The living fountains in itself contains Of beauteous and sublime : here, hand in hand, Sit paramount the Graces ; here enthroned, Celestial Venus, with divinest airs, Invites the soul to never-fading joy.
Page 124 - And through the mists of passion and of sense, And through the tossing tide of chance and pain, To hold his course unfaltering, while the voice Of truth and virtue, up the steep ascent Of nature, calls him to his high reward, The applauding smile of Heaven?
Page 187 - Refine at length, and every passion wears A chaster, milder, more attractive mien. But if to ampler prospects, if to gaze On Nature's form, where, negligent of all These lesser graces, she assumes the port Of that eternal majesty that weigh'd . The world's foundations...
Page 248 - Ask the faithful youth Why the cold urn of her whom long he lov'd So often fills his arms ; so often draws His lonely footsteps at the silent hour, To pay the mournful tribute of his tears? Oh ! he will tell thee, that the wealth of worlds Should ne'er seduce his bosom to forego That sacred hour...
Page 30 - Muse, though artless, was not mute : Of elegance as yet he took no care; For this of time and culture is the fruit ; And Edwin gain'd at last this fruit so rare : As in some future verse I purpose to declare.

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