Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture (Google eBook)

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Harper Collins, Jan 25, 2011 - Family & Relationships - 272 pages
57 Reviews

The acclaimed author of the groundbreaking bestseller Schoolgirls reveals the dark side of pink and pretty: the rise of the girlie-girl, she warns, is not that innocent.

Pink and pretty or predatory and hardened, sexualized girlhood influences our daughters from infancy onward, telling them that how a girl looks matters more than who she is. Somewhere between the exhilarating rise of Girl Power in the 1990s and today, the pursuit of physical perfection has been recast as a source—the source—of female empowerment. And commercialization has spread the message faster and farther, reaching girls at ever-younger ages.

But, realistically, how many times can you say no when your daughter begs for a pint-size wedding gown or the latest Hannah Montana CD? And how dangerous is pink and pretty anyway—especially given girls' successes in the classroom and on the playing field? Being a princess is just make-believe, after all; eventually they grow out of it. Or do they? Does playing Cinderella shield girls from early sexualization—or prime them for it? Could today's little princess become tomorrow's sexting teen? And what if she does? Would that make her in charge of her sexuality—or an unwitting captive to it?

Those questions hit home with Peggy Orenstein, so she went sleuthing. She visited Disneyland and the international toy fair, trolled American Girl Place and Pottery Barn Kids, and met beauty pageant parents with preschoolers tricked out like Vegas showgirls. She dissected the science, created an online avatar, and parsed the original fairy tales. The stakes turn out to be higher than she—or we—ever imagined: nothing less than the health, development, and futures of our girls. From premature sexualization to the risk of depression to rising rates of narcissism, the potential negative impact of this new girlie-girl culture is undeniable—yet armed with awareness and recognition, parents can effectively counterbalance its influence in their daughters' lives.

Cinderella Ate My Daughter is a must-read for anyone who cares about girls, and for parents helping their daughters navigate the rocky road to adulthood.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Helcura - LibraryThing

I found this book really depressing, which is not to say it is not good nor that it is not worth reading. It's just hard to be reminded that so much effort put into social change by so many people for ... Read full review

Review: Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture

User Review  - Risa - Goodreads

I love pink and princesses, and I always have, but this book has given me quite a bit to reconsider. It has already begun to influence the way I interact with my two and a half year old god-daughter ... Read full review

All 6 reviews »

Contents

Why I Hoped for a Boy
1
Pinked
33
What Makes Girls Girls?
55
CHAPTER5 Sparkle Sweetie
73
CHAPTER6 Guns and Briar Roses
95
The Other Disney Princesses
113
Its All About the Cape
133
Just Between You Me and My 622
159
Girl PowerNo Really
179
Acknowledgments
193
Notes
195
Bibliography
223
Index
231
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Peggy Orenstein is the author of the New York Times bestseller Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and One Woman's Quest to Become a Mother and Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self-Esteem, and the Confidence Gap. A contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine, she has been published in, among others, USA Today; Vogue; Parenting; O, The Oprah Magazine; Salon; and The New Yorker. Orenstein lives in Northern California with her husband and their daughter, Daisy.

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