Resurrection: the confirmation of Clarence Thomas

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Viking, 1994 - Biography & Autobiography - 225 pages
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Senator "Jack" Danforth is one of the most respected men in the U.S. Senate. When Clarence Thomas was nominated to the Supreme Court in 1991, Danforth gladly pledged himself to be Thomas's guide and sponsor through the customary rounds of informal interviews with key senators. A three-term senator from Missouri, Danforth believed that despite the political opposition, Thomas's hardwon rise from poverty, his integrity, and his personal record would win the Senate's confirmation. After days of arduous politicking and probing testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Danforth was sure he had the votes and that the Senate would confirm Thomas by a close but safe margin. Then, when the committee's deliberations were shattered by Anita Hill's explosive charges of sexual harassment, Thomas felt - correctly - that his enemies' goals were now not just to defeat him but to destroy him. Danforth's hopeful confidence turned to bitterness as he watched his fellow senators back off their earlier support of Thomas's nomination and their stated admiration of his character. In Resurrection, Danforth, an ordained minister, tells this story of inspiration and spiritual regeneration. It is a cautionary tale and an example of how one man and his loyal friends persevered when the world was against them and all seemed lost. But it is also the ultimate insider's own confession: Senator John C. Danforth's deeply personal revelation of how, in a good cause - that of winning a seat on the Court for his friend Clarence Thomas - he himself came very close to losing his own soul, in his anger and rage at Thomas's enemies and his willingness to do whatever it took to get Thomas confirmed.

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Resurrection: the confirmation of Clarence Thomas

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In a book whose title suggests strong religious symbolism, Senator John Danforth (R-Mo.), who is also an ordained Episcopal priest, recounts the battle, both public and private, political and personal ... Read full review

Contents

Death and Life
29
Futility and Victory
159
Afterword
198
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

John C. Danforth is an ordained Episcopal priest, former three-term U.S. senator (R- MO), and former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. In 2001, President Bush appointed Danforth as special envoy for peace in Sudan, where he worked to broker a peace agreement that, in 2005, ultimately ended the twenty-year civil war.

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