A History of California: The Spanish Period (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1921 - California - 527 pages
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Page 62 - Iztapalapa, and when we saw so many cities and villages built in the water and other great towns on dry land and that straight and level Causeway going towards Mexico, we were amazed and said that it was like the enchantments they tell of in the legend of Amadis, on account of the great towers and cues and buildings rising from the water, and all built of masonry.
Page 416 - Forty years on wall and bastion swept the hollow idle breeze, Since the Russian eagle fluttered from the California seas. Forty years on wall and bastion wrought its slow but sure decay ; And St. George's cross was lifted in the port of Monterey. And the citadel was lighted, and the hall was gayly drest, All to honor Sir George Simpson, famous traveller and guest.
Page 484 - Under the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo between the United States and Mexico, which...
Page 98 - ... besought almighty God of his goodness to give him life and leave to sail once in an English ship in that sea.
Page 106 - Our Generall hauing now bestowed vpon them diuers things, at their departure they restored them all againe, none carrying with him anything of whatsoeuer hee had receiued, thinking themselues sufficiently enriched and happie that they had found so free accesse to see vs.
Page 91 - America may be call'd the longest, and most dreadful of any in the world ; as well because of the vast ocean to be cross'd, being almost the one half of the terraqueous globe, with the wind always a-head; as for the terrible tempests that happen there, one upon the back of another, and for the desperate diseases that seize people, in...
Page 91 - Mexico in 1697, it was characterized as the longest, and most dreadful of any in the world; as well because of the vast ocean to be cross'd, being almost the one half of the terraqueous globe, with the wind always a-head; as for the terrible tempests that happen there, one upon the back of another, and for the desperate diseases that seize people, in seven or eight months lying at sea, sometimes near the line, sometimes cold, sometimes temperate, and sometimes hot, which is enough to destroy a man...
Page 105 - ... their cheekes in a monstrous manner, the blood streaming downe along their brests, besides despoiling the vpper parts of their bodies of those single couerings they formerly had, and holding their hands aboue their heads that they might not rescue their brests from harme, they would with furie cast themselues vpon the ground, neuer respecting whether it were cleane or soft, but dashed themselues in this manner on hard stones, knobby hillocks, stocks of wood, and pricking bushes, or whateuer else...
Page 408 - The climate is so good that all are getting to look like Englishmen. This is the most peaceful and quiet country in the world; one lives better here than in the...
Page 107 - ... neither were it the women alone which did this, but even old men, roaring and crying out, were as violent as the women were.

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