Farnham's Freehold

Front Cover
Baen, Feb 1, 1994 - Fiction - 352 pages
32 Reviews
Hugh Farnham was a practical, self-made man, and when he saw the clouds of nuclear war gathering, he built a bomb shelter under his house, hoping for peace and preparing for war. What he hadn't expected was that when the apocalypse came, a thermonuclear blast would tear apart the fabric of time and hurl his shelter into a world with no sign of other human beings.

But Farnham's small group had barely settled down to the back-breaking business of low-tech survival when they found that they were not alone after all. The same nuclear war that had catapulted Farnham two thousand years into the future had destroyed all civilization in the northern hemisphere. And the world had changed in more ways than one.

In the new world order, Farnham and his family, being members of the race that had nearly destroyed the world, were fit only to be slaves. After surviving a nuclear war, Farnham had no intention of being anybody's slave, but the tyrannical power of the Chosen Race reached throughout the world. Even if he managed to escape, where could he run to...?

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The ideals and characterization in it are outdated. - Goodreads
The character development in the novel was terrible. - Goodreads
The plot started off okay and then went downhill. - Goodreads
So, I'm not inclined to forgive the plot of this story. - Goodreads

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - exfed - LibraryThing

My reading of Heinlein's Farnham's Freehold confirms my earlier conclusions that he was a very unique SF author. Its not great literature, but its entertaining! In this novel we get a bomb shelter ... Read full review

Review: Farnham's Freehold

User Review  - GR Reader - Goodreads

There was an enticing rumor going round at one point that a Blue Club edition of this book existed, with the bridge sequences extended and some rather sexy new ones added. Unfortunately, it turned out to be a hoax. Pity. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
15
Section 3
41
Copyright

24 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

Robert Anson Heinlein was born on July 7, 1907 in Butler, Mo. The son of Rex Ivar and Bam Lyle Heinlein, Robert Heinlein had two older brothers, one younger brother, and three younger sisters. Moving to Kansas City, Mo., at a young age, Heinlein graduated from Central High School in 1924 and attended one year of college at Kansas City Community College. Following in his older brother's footsteps, Heinlein entered the Navel Academy in 1925. After contracting pulmonary tuberculosis, of which he was later cured, Heinlein retired from the Navy and married Leslyn Macdonald. Heinlein was said to have held jobs in real estate and photography, before he began working as a staff writer for Upton Sinclair's EPIC News in 1938. Still needing money desperately, Heinlein entered a writing contest sponsored by the science fiction magazine Thrilling Wonder Stories. Heinlein wrote and submitted the story "Life-Line," which went on to win the contest. This guaranteed Heinlein a future in writing. Using his real name and the pen names Caleb Saunders, Anson MacDonald, Lyle Monroe, John Riverside, and Simon York, Heinlein wrote numerous novels including For Us the Living, Methuselah's Children, and Starship Troopers, which was adapted into a big-budget film for Tri-Star Pictures in 1997. Heinlein died in 1988 from emphysema and other related health problems. Heinlein's remains were scattered from the stern of a Navy warship off the coast of California.

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