The Bhagavad Gītā

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Franklin Edgerton
Harvard University Press, Jan 1, 1972 - Philosophy - 202 pages
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To most good Vishnuites, and to most Hindus, the Bhagavad Gita is what the New Testament is to good Christians. It is their chief devotional book, and has been for centuries the principal source of religious inspiretion for many millions of Indian. In this two-volume edition, Volume I contains on facing pages a transliteration of original Sanskirt and the autor's close translation. Volume II is Mr. Edgerton's interpretation in which he makes clear the historical setting of the poem and analyzes its influence on later literature and its place in Indian philosophy. Sir Edwin Arnold's beautiful translation, "The Song Celestial," is also includes in the second volume.

Mr. Edgerton is the author of many books and articles in the fields of Egyptology and Oriental languages and literature. He is an editor of the American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literature.

  

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Contents

THE BHAGAVAD GITA i
3
NOTES TO THE TRANSLATION
92
PART II
98
THE UPANISADS AND THE FUNDAMENTAL DOCTRINES
120
SOUL AND BODY
139
THE NATURE OF GOD
146
ACTIVITY
164
RELIGIOUS BELIEFS
179
SUMMARY
189
INDEX OF WORDS AND SUBJECTS
195
Copyright

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