The lyrical poems of William Blake (Google eBook)

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Clarendon Press, 1905 - 195 pages
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Page 71 - AH! SUN-FLOWER Ah Sun-flower! weary of time, Who countest the steps of the Sun, Seeking after that sweet golden clime Where the traveller's journey is done: Where the Youth pined away with desire, And the pale Virgin shrouded in snow, Arise from their graves and aspire Where my Sun-flower wishes to go.
Page 72 - I WENT to the Garden of Love, And saw what I never had seen; A Chapel was built in the midst, Where I used to play on the green. And the gates of this Chapel were shut, And "Thou shalt not" writ over the door; So I turned to the Garden of Love That so many sweet flowers bore.
Page 43 - NURSE'S SONG WHEN the voices of children are heard on the green And laughing is heard on the hill, My heart is at rest within my breast, And everything else is still. Then come home, my children, the sun is gone down, And the dews of the night arise; Come, come, leave off play, and let us away Till the morning appears in the skies.
Page xliii - The wanton Boy that kills the Fly Shall feel the Spider's enmity. He who torments the Chafer's Sprite Weaves a Bower in endless Night. The Catterpiller on the Leaf Repeats to thee thy Mother's grief. Kill not the Moth nor Butterfly, For the Last Judgment draweth nigh.
Page 66 - I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. And I water'd it in fears, Night & morning with my tears; And I sunned it with smiles, And with soft deceitful wiles. And it grew both day and night, Till it bore an apple bright; And my foe beheld it shine, And he knew that it was mine, And into my garden stole When the night had...
Page 81 - Pity would be no more If we did not make somebody poor; And mercy no more could be If all were as happy as we.
Page 102 - tis all in vain ! You throw the sand against the wind, And the wind blows it back again. And every sand becomes a gem Reflected in the beams divine ; Blown back they blind the mocking eye, But still in Israel's paths they shine.
Page 77 - I wander thro' each charter'd street, Near where the charter'd Thames does flow, And mark in every face I meet Marks of weakness, marks of woe.
Page 47 - Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love All pray in their distress ; And to these virtues of delight Return their thankfulness. For Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love Is God, our Father dear, And Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love Is man, His child and care. For Mercy has a human heart, Pity a human face, And Love, the human form divine, And Peace, the human dress.
Page 12 - By love are driv'n away; And mournful lean Despair Brings me yew to deck my grave: Such end true lovers have. His face is fair as heav'n When springing buds unfold; O why to him was't giv'n, Whose heart is wintry cold?

References from web pages

William Blake, 1757-1827: A Descriptive Catalogue of an Exhibition ...
The Lyrical Poems of William Blake , edited by John Sampson...design is there given, with bibliography. 2 See, for example...in S. Foster Damon, ...
www.questia.com/ library/ book/ william-blake-1757-1827-a-descriptive-catalogue-of-an-exhibition-of-the-works-of-willia...

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