Towards a More Equal Society?: Poverty, Inequality and Policy Since 1997

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John Hills, Tom Sefton, Kitty Stewart
Policy Press, 2009 - Political Science - 415 pages
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When New Labour came to power in 1997, its leaders asked for it to be judged after ten years on its success in making Britain 'a more equal society'. As it approaches the end of an unprecedented third term in office, this book asks whether Britain has indeed moved in that direction. The highly successful earlier volume "A more equal society?" was described by Polly Toynbee as "the LSE's mighty judgement on inequality". Now this second volume by the same team of authors provides an independent assessment of the success or otherwise of New Labour's policies over a longer period. It provides: [vbTab]consideration by a range of expert authors of a broad set of indicators and policy areas affecting poverty, inequality and social exclusion; [vbTab]analysis of developments up to the third term on areas including income inequality, education, employment, health inequalities, neighbourhoods, minority ethnic groups, children and older people;[vbTab]an assessment of outcomes a decade on, asking whether policies stood up to the challenges, and whether successful strategies have been sustained or have run out of steam;chapters on migration, social attitudes, the devolved administrations, the new Equality and Human Rights Commission, and future pressures.The book is essential reading for academic and student audiences with an interest in contemporary social policy, as well as for all those seeking an objective account of Labour's achievements in power.
  

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we must read for income inequality.

Contents

Figures
2
Tables
6
two Poverty inequality and redistribution
21
4a Net incomes for hypothetical family types on half average earnings
32
child poverty and disadvantage
47
New Labours top priority
71
five More equal working lives? An assessment of New Labour policies
91
Figures continued
99
Tables continued
171
another 10 years of the same?
179
ten Migration migrants and inequality
201
eleven Moving in the right direction? Public attitudes to poverty inequality
223
ScotlandWales
245
a new point
293
Tables continued
316
intergenerational links wealth demography
319

six New Labour and unequal neighbourhoods
115
a persistent problem
135
Figures continued
149
eight Pensions and income security in later life
157
climbing every mountain or retreating from the foothills?
341
References
361
Index
399
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About the author (2009)

John Hills, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics and Political Science, Tom Sefton, ESRC Research Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics and Political Science and Kitty Stewart, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics and Political Science

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