Peripatetic Philosophy, 200 BC to AD 200: An Introduction and Collection of Sources in Translation (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 14, 2010 - Philosophy
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This book provides a collection of sources, many of them fragmentary and previously scattered and hard to access, for the development of Peripatetic philosophy in the later Hellenistic period and the early Roman Empire. It also supplies the background against which the first commentator on Aristotle from whom extensive material survives, Alexander of Aphrodisias (fl. c. AD 200), developed his interpretations which continue to be influential even today. Many of the passages are here translated into English for the first time, including the whole of the summary of Peripatetic ethics attributed to 'Arius Didymus'.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Individuals
9
Chapter 1 People
11
Chapter 2 The rediscovery of Aristotles works?
24
Chapter 3 A Hellenistic account of Aristotles philosophy
31
Chapter 4 Philosophy and rhetoric
35
Chapter 5 The starting point and parts of philosophy
40
Chapter 6 Commentaries
44
Chapter 16 Emotions
134
oikeiosis
150
Chapter 18 Bodily and external goods and happiness
155
Physics
169
chapter 19 The nature of time and place
171
Chapter 20 The eternity of the world
175
Chapter 21 The heavens
180
Chapter 22 God and providence
196

Logic and ontology
45
i Placement and title
47
ii Words or things?
49
iii Ten categories or two?
58
iv Time and place
64
Chapter 11 On Interpretation
70
form and matter
75
Chapter 13 Logic
90
Chapter 14 Theory of knowledge
101
Ethics
109
Stobaeus Doxography C
111
Chapter 23 Fate choice and what depends on us
211
Chapter 24 Soul
235
Chapter 25 Generation
252
Chapter 26 Sensation
257
Chapter 27 Intellect
266
Bibliography
276
Index of sources
289
Index of passages cited
302
Index of personal names ancient
305
General index
307
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Robert W. Sharples is Emeritus Professor of Classics at University College London. He has published extensively on the Peripatetic tradition in antiquity, notably in the context of the Theophrastus Project and of the Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series. He is currently a member of the team working on the decipherment of a commentary on Aristotle preserved in the Archimedes Palimpsest. He has also published a successful textbook, Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics (1996), and a number of editions of ancient texts.

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