The philosophy of medicine (Google eBook)

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Printed by C. Whittingham, for T. Cox, 1799 - Medicine
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Page 262 - ... his children — But here my heart began to bleed, and I was forced to go on with another part of the portrait. He was sitting upon the ground, upon a little straw in the furthest corner of his dungeon, which was alternately his chair and bed...
Page 262 - In thirty years the western breeze had not once fanned his blood : he had seen no sun, no moon, in all that time, nor had the voice of friend or kinsman breathed through his lattice : his children — but here my heart began to bleed, and I was forced to go on with another part of the portrait.
Page 172 - The smallpox, so fatal and so general amongst us, is here entirely harmless by the invention of ingrafting, which is the term they give it. There is a set of old women who make it their business to perform the operation every autumn, in the month of September, when the great heat is abated. People send to one another to know if any of their family has a mind to have the smallpox...
Page 80 - Extolling patience as the truest fortitude ; And to the bearing well of all calamities, All chances incident to man's frail life, Consolatories writ With studied argument, and much persuasion sought...
Page 19 - ... ermine, to save us from this pollution. I call upon the honour of your lordships, to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country, to vindicate the national character. I invoke the genius of the constitution.
Page 18 - I feel myself impelled by every duty. My Lords, we are called upon as members of this House, as men, as Christian men, to protest against such notions standing near the Throne, polluting the ear of Majesty. "That God and nature put into our hands!
Page 260 - ... and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries. His plan is original ; and it is as full of genius as it is of humanity. It was a voyage of discovery ; a circumnavigation of charity.
Page 262 - ... these little sticks in his hand, and with a rusty nail he was etching another day of misery to add to the heap. As I darkened the little light he had, he lifted up a hopeless eye towards the door, then cast it down shook his head, and went on with his work of affliction. I heard his chains upon his legs, as he turned his body to lay his little stick upon the bundle. He gave a deep sigh I saw the iron enter into his soul I burst into tears I could not sustain the picture of confinement which my...
Page 18 - I know not what ideas that lord may entertain of God and nature ; but I know that such abominable principles are equally abhorrent to religion and humanity. What...
Page 172 - ... that part of the arm that is concealed. The children or young patients play together all the rest of the day, and are in perfect health to the eighth. Then the fever begins to seize them, and they keep their beds two days, very seldom three. They have very rarely above twenty or thirty in their faces, which never mark ; and in eight days' time they are as well as before their illness.

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