Commenting and Commentaries

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Solid Ground Christian Books, Feb 1, 2006 - Reference - 212 pages
2 Reviews
The student or pastor with a small but growing library, as well as the pastor possessing an extensive one, will welcome the opportunity to secure this reprint of Spurgeon's catalog of Biblical commentaries and expositions. Once you begin to dip into this volume it will become a faithful friend by your side. Worth its weight in gold! "New commentaries on the Bible abound, but often the cutting edge is dull. With few exceptions, the old works are better by far. Spurgeon's Commenting and Commentaries is invaluable for identifying the best works of past generations, many of which have been reprinted in our day." - Dr. Robert P. Martin

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Review: Commenting and Commentaries

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

4th volume of Spurgeon's Lectures to My Students. Very funny. Read full review

Review: Commenting and Commentaries

User Review  - Chris Comis - Goodreads

We actually had to read this for Greyfriars. I pretty much skimmed through it since there wasn't much to read, only reference. The one reference I remember was Spurgeon's praise for Moses Stuart's ... Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Charles Haddon Spurgeon was born on June 19, 1834, at Kelvedon, Essex, England, the firstborn of eight surviving children. His parents were committed Christians, and his father was a preacher. Spurgeon was converted in 1850 at the age of fifteen. He began to help the poor and to hand out tracts; he was known as "The Boy Preacher." His next six years were eventful. He preached his first sermon at the age of sixteen. At age eighteen, he became the pastor of Waterbeach Baptist Chapel, preaching in a barn. Spurgeon preached over six hundred times before he reached the age of twenty. By 1854, he was well-known and was asked to become the pastor of New Park Street Chapel in London. In 1856, Spurgeon married Susannah Thompson; they had twin sons, both of whom later entered the ministry. Spurgeon's compelling sermons and lively preaching style drew multitudes of people, and many came to Christ. Soon, the crowds had grown so large that they blocked the narrow streets near the church. Services eventually had to be held in rented halls, and Spurgeon often preached to congregations of more than ten thousand. The Metropolitan Tabernacle was built in 1861 to accommodate the large numbers of people. Spurgeon published over thirty-five hundred sermons, which were so popular that they sold by the ton. At one point, twenty-five thousand copies of his sermons sold every week. The prime minister of England, members of the royal family, and Florence Nightingale, among others, went to hear him preach. Spurgeon preached to an estimated ten million people throughout his life. Not surprisingly, he is called the "Prince of Preachers." In addition to his powerful preaching, Spurgeon founded and supported charitable outreaches, including educational institutions. His pastors' college, which is still in existence today, taught nearly nine hundred students in Spurgeon's time. He also founded the famous Stockwell Orphanage. Charles Spurgeon died in 1892, and his death was mourned by many.

Joel Beeke is a pastor and author in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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