The Yemassee

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 1964 - Fiction - 416 pages
2 Reviews
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Review: Yemassee: Romance of Carolina

User Review  - Pat - Goodreads

Dated writing style (early 1800s) and attitudes, but a good story based on real incidents. Read full review

Review: Yemassee: Romance of Carolina

User Review  - Jed - Goodreads

Read just for the storybook value, this is a pretty good one. Read for the historical/sociological value, this is a treasure trove. Written just before the outbreak of the Civil War, Simms, a partisan ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

CHAPTER I
27
CHAPTER II
32
CHAPTER III
38
CHAPTER IV
45
CHAPTER V
51
CHAPTER VI
59
CHAPTER VII
67
CHAPTER VIII
81
CHAPTER XVIII
228
CHAPTER XXIX
234
CHAPTER XXX
241
CHAPTER XXXI
247
CHAPTER XXXII
254
CHAPTER XXXIII
261
CHAPTER XXXIV
267
CHAPTER XXXV
277

CHAPTER IX
90
CHAPTER X
97
CHAPTER XI
107
CHAPTER XII
114
CHAPTER XIII
120
CHAPTER XIV
128
CHAPTER XV
132
CHAPTER XVI
138
CHAPTER XVII
148
CHAPTER XVIII
154
CHAPTER XIX
161
CHAPTER XX
166
CHAPTER XXI
173
CHAPTER XXII
179
CHAPTER XXIII
187
CHAPTER XXIV
195
CHAPTER XXV
201
CHAPTER XXVI
214
CHAPTER XXVII
223
CHAPTER XXXVI
282
CHAPTER XXXVII
287
CHAPTER XXXVIII
294
CHAPTER XXXIX
305
CHAPTER XL
310
CHAPTER XLI
316
CHAPTER XLII
323
CHAPTER XLIII
331
CHAPTER XLIV
338
CHAPTER XLV
345
CHAPTER XLVI
354
CHAPTER XLVII
364
CHAPTER XLVIII
371
CHAPTER XLIX
384
CHAPTER L
390
CHAPTER LI
397
CHAPTER LII
404
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Popular passages

Page 23 - In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend; And if the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, in spite of trivial faults, is due.
Page 23 - modern romance is the substitute which the people of the present day offer for the ancient epic," and his heart beat to be another Homer.
Page 24 - Croly — are very much those of the epic. It invests individuals with an absorbing interest — it hurries them rapidly through crowding and exacting events, in a narrow space of time — it requires the same unities of plan, of purpose, and of harmony of parts, and it seeks for its adventures among the wild and wonderful.
Page 24 - When I say that our Romance is the substitute of modern times for the epic or the drama, I do not mean to say that they are exactly the same things, and yet, examined thoroughly . . . the differences between them are very slight. These differences depend upon the material employed, rather than upon the particular mode in which it is used.

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About the author (1964)

William Gilmore Simms was born in Charleston, South Carolina, April, 17 1806. His academic education was received in the school of his native city, where he was for a time a clerk in a drug and chemical house. Though his first aspirations were for medicine, he studied law at eighteen, but never practised. In 1827, he published in Charleston a volume of Lyrical and other Poems, his first attempt in literature. The following year, he became editor and partial owner of the Charleston City Gazette. In 1829 he published another volume of poems, The Vision of Cortes, and in 1830, The Tricolor. His paper proved a bad investment, and through its failure, in 1833, he was left penniless. Simms decided to devote himself to literature, and began a long series of volumes which did not end till within three years of his death.He published a poem entitled "Atalantis, a Tale of the Sea" (New York, 1832), the best and longest of all his poetic works. The Yemassee is considered his best novel, but Simms is mainly known as a writer of fiction, the scene of his novels is almost wholly southern. He was for many years a member of the legislature, and in 1846 was defeated for lieutenant-governor by only one vote. Simmd died in Charleston on June, 11 1870.

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