Odes

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Harvard University Press, 2009 - History - 445 pages
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Francesco Filelfo (1398‚e"1481), one of the great scholar-poets of the Italian Renaissance, was the principal humanist working in Lombardy in the middle of the Quattrocento and served as court poet to the Visconti and Sforza dukes of Milan. His long life saw him as busy with politics, diplomacy, and intrigue as with literature and scholarship, leaving him very often on the run from rival factions‚e"and even from hired assassins. The first Latin poet of the Renaissance to explore the expressive potential of Horatian meters, Filelfo adapted the traditions of Augustan literature to address personal and political concerns in his own day.

The Odes, completed in the mid-1450s, constitute the first complete cycle of Horatian odes since classical antiquity and are a major literary achievement. Their themes include war, just rule, love, exile, patronage, and friendship as well as topical subjects like the plague‚e(tm)s grim effects on Milan. This volume is the first publication of the Latin text since the fifteenth century and the first translation into English.

  

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Contents

Preface to the Odes
3
Lamenting his abandonment
9
BOOK I
13
On war and the consolation of
27
To Charles VII of France
35
On the Christian religion
41
On greed
55
To a glutton
61
Epithalamium
192
of his mistress Lyda and his friend Filelfo
202
Why he has not yet come
208
BOOK IV
221
A request for cash
228
Encomium
238
On wealth and virtue
253
An invective against the city of Cremona
261

On war and writing poetry
75
BOOK II
85
An invective against false liberty
101
In praise of piety
116
In praise of his generosity
123
A consolation for
133
Praise for liberating Milan
139
BOOK III
153
An elegy written during
163
A hymn for Sforzas triumphal
179
That he not serve the Cyprian
185
An exhortation to seek peace
267
BOOK V
289
In praise of love and poetry
295
Thanks for the gift
301
That he honor his patrons
323
To Ludovico Gonzaga Francesco Sforza
331
A dialogue of the gods
347
Biographical Notes
357
The Meters of Filelfos Odes
377
Notes to the Translation
389
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Diana Robin is Professor Emerita of Classics, University of New Mexico, and Scholar in Residence at the Newberry Library.

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