Words Without Meaning

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MIT Press, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 299 pages
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According to the received view of linguistic communication, the primary function of language is to enable speakers to reveal the propositional contents of their thoughts to hearers. Speakers are able to do this because they share with their hearers an understanding of the meanings of words. Christopher Gauker rejects this conception of language, arguing that it rests on an untenable conception of mental representation and yields a wrong account of the norms of discourse.Gauker's alternative starts with the observation that conversations have goals and that the best way to achieve the goal of a conversation depends on the circumstances under which the conversation takes place. These goals and circumstances determine a context of utterance quite apart from the attitudes of the interlocutors. The fundamental norms of discourse are formulated in terms of the conditions under which sentences are assertible in such contexts.Words without Meaning contains original solutions to a wide array of outstanding problems in the philosophy of language, including the logic of quantification, the logic of conditionals, the semantic paradoxes, the nature of presupposition and implicature, and the nature and attribution of beliefs.

  

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Contents

The Received View
3
Semantics
17
Mental Representation
27
Elements of an Alternative
49
Pragmatics
71
Domain of Discourse
73
Presupposition
97
Implicature
121
Quantification
145
Conditionals
167
Truth
191
The Communicative Conception
215
Explanation and Prediction
237
Semantics and Ontology
259
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About the author (2003)

Christopher Gauker is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Cincinnati.