History of California, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
N.J. Stone, 1885 - California
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Contents

s Project of changing the name of Alta California to Moctezuma
91
ECHEANDIA CONTINUED
107
Rejoicings at the suppression of the rebellion Father Caballeros extravagant
113
Decree for the reorganization of the Californian military forces
119
CHAPTER V
125
His ideas of the administration of justice capital executions under obsolete la
131
CHAPTER VI
143
Renewal of the quarrel between Echeandia and the deputation Agustin V
149
How the caravan trade in serapes and mules between California and New Mex
155
CHAPTER VIII
181
CHAPTER IX
198
Distinction between the mission the presidio and the village question of pueblo
204
Abuses of the commissioners Figueroas mitigation of unavoidable evils
210
How Jose Antonio Estudillo failed to become governor
216
Condition of the missions in their most flourishing period shortly before secular
221
His centralism and opposition to secularization
222
CHAPTER XI
236
Alvarados Santa Barbara proclamation the silent revolution he effected
242
How the new appointment was announced Jose Antonio Carrillos letter to
245
His proclamation of the termination of hostilities
251
Dissatisfaction of San Jose with the preference given the pueblo of Dolores
257
Elections of 1839 and meeting of the first departmental junta in 1840
263
Captain Forrests letter to Alvarado about the seizure of American citizens
270
Livermore Gulnac lierry Mcintosh Allen Cooper Bill the Sawyer Peace
276
His settlement of New Helvetia
282
Remaining mementos of the Russians
288
CHAPTER XIV
295
Affairs at San Francisco Santa Clara and San Jose missions
303
Delay of the government in organizing its superior tribunal of justice Alva
309
Wretehed condition of his soldiers on their arrival
316
CHAPTER II
334
How Rafael Telles attempted to restrain the excesses of the troops
335
Reduction of official salaries order concerning doctors charges prosecution
341
Relations between Micheltorena and Sutter
347
How Castro induced a party of foreigners to withdraw from the contest
353
Lower California affairs
357
Mexican forestry laws efforts to stop the destruction of trees
364
The bill of rights sections copied from New York and Iowa additional sec
365
Controversy between Pico and Nicolas Botello the latters withdrawal from
370
Case of Stephen Smith how he settled in California and started the first steam
376
Wretched condition of the establishments and the remaining Indians
382
Castros junta of officers at Monterey ratification of the Plan of San Luis
396
Picos objections to Castros military junta
402
His declaration of martial law throughout the department
408
Castros proclamation to his soldiers his letter to Pico on the bearflag atrocity
409
CHAPTER VI
415
Bentons extraordinary account of Fremonts services
421
Bitter feelings of Americans against the Vallejos precautions taken to prevent
427
Origin of the bearflag party and who composed it
431
The terms of the proclamation objects of the bearflag party
437
FEASTS DANCES AND AMUSEMENTS Page
499
Grand fandango at the house of Juan Bandini dancing el jarabe
506
CHAPTER XII
513
Forbes estimate
519
Fathers Boscana and Zalveder at San Juan Capistrano
522
The mission system first an advantage afterwards an obstacle to progress
528
Monte Diablo the view from its summit
534
Islands
540
CHAPTER III
545
Geysers solfataras and hot springs
546
Soils
550
Ceanothus azalea and rhododendron
556
Elks deer mountain sheep
562
General summary
568
Stockton at San Pedro Castros peace commissioners
584
Movements of Fremont failure of his voyage his return to Monterey
601
The instructions that were given him
607
Arrival in California meeting with Gillespie
613
The march meeting with peace commissioners Flores letter
619
CHAPTER IV
625
His resignation and retirement 314
630
Arrangement between Kearny and Shubrick their agreement with Commodore
631
Fremonts position at Los Angeles how he was obliged to obey Kearny
637
Commander Montgomerys seizure of San Jose del Cabo raising of the Ameri
643
The advance on Mexico battle of Cerro Gordo Nicholas P Trisls commis
646
Battle of Chapultepec
652
Arrest of Nash his submission
658
His general order for trials by jury experience and disapprobation of courts
664
How he prevented any further revolt correspondence and meeting with Jose
669
Letter describing his position
675
Losses of the Donner party how the memorials of starvation camp were
681
Arrival of gold in quantities at San Francisco the excitement there
687
His estimates of the gold yield condition of affairs at the mines
693
His visit to New Almaden and what he saw there
694
CHAPTER VIII
701
Propositions and resolutions of the California people to form a government
707
His assumption of office as governor under the Buchanan theory
713
His orders for the election of delegates to a constitutional convention and of offi
714
San Francisco a center for speculators Baron Steinberger
720
Trial and punishment of the ringleaders
726
Rileys visit to the mines
732
Importance of the subject of land titles the laws and documents on which they
739
Present condition of the archives and their value
745
Questions as to pueblos and pueblo claims
751
The Californjan members who neither spoke nor understood English employ
757
Unanimous adoption of a section against slavery
758
Expressions of opinion on the subject of gambling 74
765
The sections relating to revenue and taxation
771
The judiciary under the old system
777

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 102 - and am anxious to get there as soon as the nature of the case will admit. Our situation is quite unpleasant, being destitute of clothing and most of the necessaries of life at this time, wild meat being our principal subsistence. I am, Reverend Father, your strange but real friend and Christian brother."
Page 616 - violated every principle of international law and national hospitality by hunting and pursuing, with several hundred soldiers and with wicked intent, Captain Fremont of the United States army, who came to refresh his men, about forty in number, after
Page 698 - ears of a single insult offered or outrage done by a Mormon volunteer. So high an opinion in fact did he entertain of the battalion in general and of their especial fitness for the duties of garrisoning the country, that he made strenuous
Page 288 - proclamation, bearing date May 8, 1840. Their object seems to have been to recommend and endorse their chief. They commenced with the words: " Eternal glory to the illustrious champion and liberator of the Department of Alta California, Don Jose Castro, the guardian of order and the supporter of our superior government.
Page 738 - according them their rights. It was true that the very limited power of the executive had been exercised to preserve and protect them from the inevitable consequences of
Page 780 - claiming lands by virtue of any right or title derived from the Spanish or Mexican government was required to present

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