Classic American Philosophers: Peirce, James, Royce, Santayana, Dewey, Whitehead : Selections from Their Writings (Google eBook)

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Max Harold Fisch
Fordham Univ Press, 1996 - Philosophy - 501 pages
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It is increasingly apparant that American philosophy has had its classical period, corresponding to the Greek classical period - Democritus through Aristotle; the medieval - Christian Abelard through Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus; The British - Bacon through Hume; and the German - Kant through Hegel. America's classical period began just after the Civil War and ended just before the Second World War. Its canon is already nearly fixed, and it includes six philosophers: Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, Josiah Royce, George Santayana, John Dewey, and Alfred North Whitehead. The primary purpose of this voume is to introduce these philosophers to readers who do not yet know their writings at first hand. The writings of each of these philosophers is enhanved by a thoughtful introduction to each. The volume as a whole is framed by a detailed introduction exlporing these philosopher's place in America's Classic Period of Philosophy. The book is perfect for beginning students of or enthusiasts about American philosophy and philosophy in general. The text is followed by an appendix which makes suggestions for further readings produced by these classic American philosophers.
  

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Contents

The Classic Period in American Philosophy
1
CHARLES SANDERS PEIRCE
41
1 The Fixation of Belief
54
2 How to Make Our Ideas Clear
70
3 The Architecture of Theories
87
4 The Doctrine of Necessity Examined
100
WILLIAM JAMES
115
1 What Pragmatism Means
128
5 The Religion of Loyalty
242
GEORGE SANTAYANA
257
1 Scepticism and Animal Faith
268
2 Reason in Ethics
297
3 Ultimate Religion
317
JOHN DEWEY
327
1 The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy
336
2 The Supremacy of Method
344

2 The Will to Believe
136
3 Does Consciousness Exist?
148
4 The Continuity of Experience
160
5 The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life
165
JOSIAH ROYCE
181
1 The Nature of Community
200
2 Interpretation
212
3 Reality
226
4 Science and the Progress of Christianity
234
3 The Construction of Good
360
4 Science and Society
381
5 Creative DemocracyThe Task Before Us
389
ALFRED NORTH WHITEHEAD
395
1 Nature and Life
418
2 Speculative Philosophy
437
3 Religion
451
4 Civilization
454
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Page 23 - The truth of an idea is not a stagnant property inherent in it. Truth happens to an idea. It becomes true, is made true by events. Its verity is in fact an event, a process: the process namely of its verifying itself, its veri-fication. Its validity is the process of its valid-ation.
Page 14 - There is the greatest difference between presuming an opinion to be true, because with every opportunity for contesting it it has not been refuted, and assuming its truth for the purpose of not permitting its refutation. Complete liberty of contradicting and disproving our opinion is the very condition which justifies us in assuming its truth for purposes of action; and on no other terms can a being with human faculties have any rational assurance of being right.
Page 15 - The duty to keep a contract at common law means a prediction that you must pay damages if you do not keep it, and nothing else.

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About the author (1996)


Max Harold Fisch (1901-1995) was an internationally renowned scholar and recognized especially for his work on Charles S. Peirce and Giambattista Vico.

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