An Elementary Treatise on Sound: Being the Second Volume of a Course of Natural Philosophy, Designed for the Use of High Schools and Colleges (Google eBook)

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J. Munroe and Company, 1836 - Sound - 220 pages
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Page 11 - ... feet. By a most unlucky coincidence, the precise focus of divergence at the former station was chosen for the place of the confessional. — Secrets never intended for the public ear thus became known, to the dismay of the...
Page 110 - Since there is nothing in the constitution of the atmosphere to prevent the existence of vibrations incomparably more frequent than any of which we are conscious, we may imagine that animals like the grylli, whose powers appear to commence nearly where ours...
Page 111 - ... them may be said to possess another sense, agreeing with our own solely in the medium by which it is excited...
Page 55 - ... of successive portions of the original impulse in its progress through the soil at the innumerable half-coherent surfaces composing it ; were the whole soil a mass of sand, these reflections would be so strong and frequent as to destroy the whole impulse in too short an interval to allow of a distinguishable after-sound. It is a case analogous to that of a strong light, with a milky medium or smoky atmosphere ; the whole medium appears to shine with a nebulous, undefined light.
Page xix - Considérations sur les divers Systèmes de la Musique ancienne et moderne , et sur le genre enharmonique des Grecs , avec une Dissertation préliminaire relative à l'Origine du Chant, de la Lyre et de la Flûte attribuée à Van; Paris, 1810, 2 vol. in-8°; — Lettre à M.
Page 15 - ... centre. Since the velocity of electricity is incomparably greater than that of sound, the thunder may be regarded as' originating at one and the same instant in every point of the course of either flash. But it will reach the ear under very different circumstances in the two cases. In that of the circular flash, the sound from every point will arrive at the same instant, and affect the ear as a simple explosion, with stunning loudness.
Page 11 - Sicily, the slightest whisper is borne with perfect distinctness from the great western door to the cornice behind the high altar, a distance of 250 feet. By a most unlucky coincidence, the precise focus of divergence at the former station was chosen for the place of the confessional. Secrets never intended for the public ear thus became known, to the dismay of the confessors and the scandal of the people, by the resort of the curious to the opposite point (which seems to have been discovered accidentally),...
Page 65 - In consequence, if a sudden and short impulse be repeated beyond a certain degree of quickness, the ear loses the intervals of silence and the sound appears continuous.
Page 58 - ... the pull, push, or blow will reach its point of action one second after the moment of its first emanation from the first mover. In all moderate distances, then, the interval is utterly insensible. But, were the sun and the earth connected by an iron bar, no less than...
Page 11 - Gallery of St. Paul's, London, the faintest sound is faithfully conveyed from one side to the other of the dome, but is not heard at any intermediate point. In the Manfroni Palace at Venice is a square room about 25 feet high, with a concave roof, in which a person standing in the centre, and stamping gently with his foot on the floor, hears the sound repeated a great many times; but as his position deviates from the centre the reflected sounds grow fainter, and at a short distance wholly cease.

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