Of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647

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Rutgers University Press, 1952 - History - 448 pages
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The Pilgrim leader's classical account of the founding of the Plymouth colony and the events of its early years
  

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Contents

THE FIRST BOOK
xxviii
The Separatist Interpretation of the Reforma
3
Of their Departure into Holland and their
11
Showing the Reasons and Causes of Their
23
Concerning the Agreements and Articles
36
Of their Departure from Leyden and other
47
Of their Voyage and how they Passed the Sea
58
Showing how they Sought out a Place
64
Anno Domini 1634
262
Anno Domini 1635
272
Anno Domini 1636
286
Anno Domini 1637
294
Anno Domini 1639 and Anno Domini 1640
304
Anno Domini 1641
312
Anno Domini 1642
322
Anno Domini 1643
324

The Remainder of Anno 1620
75
Anno 1621
85
Anno 1622
98
Anno Domini 1623
116
Anno Domini 1624
140
Anno Domini 1625
165
Anno Domini 1626
179
Anno Domini 1628
197
Anno Domini 1629
213
Anno Domini 1630
226
Anno Domini 1631
237
Anno Domini 1632
250
Anno Domini 1644
333
Anno Domini 1645
339
Anno Domini 1646
345
Correspondence with the Virginia Company
353
HI Correspondence of June 1620 between
360
Rev John Robinsons Farewell Letters to John
367
1627
378
Governor Winthrops Letters on the Pequot
394
Opinions of Three Ministers on Unnatural Vice
404
Conclusion of Business with London Partners
414
Official Documents
421
INDEX AND FAMILIAR QUOTATIONS follow page
448

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About the author (1952)

William Bradford was born in a comfortable Yorkshire yeoman's home, but the family that might have provided him with a nurturing beginning was disrupted by the early death of Bradford's parents. Raised by his uncles to be a farmer, Bradford was a sickly youth given to private reading. In early adolescence, Bradford first heard the preaching of Richard Clyfton, a nonconformist minister who converted Bradford to the Separatist movement. A lifelong commitment to that church followed; Bradford first joined the Scrooby congregation, later migrated to Holland in 1608, and sailed with the Pilgrims in 1620. Shortly after his arrival in what is present-day Massachusetts, Bradford was elected governor of the Plymouth settlement. Bradford's principal literary contributions lie in the area of history. His account of the Puritans' early settlement provides both an invaluable document of early American life and a powerful example of how Puritan theology found expression in the literal events of history. Both Puritan theologian Cotton Mather and contemporary critics hailed Bradford's History of Plymouth Plantation (1856) as a masterpiece. Bradford's work frames the development of the Americas in biblical terms that illustrate the purposes of an omnipotent God. Bradford also employed verse in his exploration of Providence. His Collected Verse consists of largely didactic meditations. Widely read, Bradford's work influenced several generations of Puritan intellectuals. Bradford died in 1657.

Samuel Eliot Morison was born in Boston in 1887. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1912 and began teaching history there in 1915, becoming full professor in 1925 and Jonathan Trumbull professor of American history in 1941. He served as the university's official historian and wrote a three-volume history of the institution, the Tercentennial History of Harvard College and University, which was completed in 1936. Between 1922 and 1925 he was Harmsworth professor of American history at Oxford. He also was an accomplished sailor who retired from the navy in 1951 as a rear admiral. In preparing for his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies of Christopher Columbus and John Paul Jones, Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1941) and John Paul Jones: A Sailor's Biography (1952) he took himself out of the study and onto the high seas, where he traced the voyages of his subjects and "lived" their stories insofar as possible. When it came time for the U.S. Navy to select an author to write a history of its operations in World War II, Morison was the natural choice for the task. In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of U.S. naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander. The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. Although he retired from Harvard in 1955, Morison continued his research and writing. A product of the Brahmin tradition, Morison wrote about Bostonians and other New Englanders and about life in early Massachusetts. He was an "American historian" in the fullest sense of the term. He also had a keen appreciation for the larger history of the nation and world, provincial is the last word one would use to describe Morison's writing.

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