Annual Register, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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Edmund Burke
1763 - History
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Page 100 - Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them ; they shall not be ashamed when they speak with their enemies in the gate.
Page 246 - Holy and Undivided Trinity. It having pleased the Divine Providence to dispose the hearts of the Most Serene and Most Potent Prince, George the Third, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Duke of Brunswick and Lunenburg, ArchTreasurer and Prince Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, &c...
Page 236 - Ryswick of 1697; those of peace and of commerce of Utrecht of 1713; that of Baden of 1714; the treaty of the triple alliance of the Hague of 1717; that of the quadruple alliance of London of 1718; the treaty of peace of Vienna of 1738: the definitive treaty of...
Page 243 - ... the term limited for this emigration being fixed to the space of eighteen months, to be computed from the day of the exchange of the ratifications of the present treaty.
Page 229 - ... and robust to the age of twelve years, without his being able to distinguish his right hand from his left, the eyes of his understanding would be open to reason...
Page 166 - I should be exceedingly sorry to find the Legislature make any new laws against the practice of duelling ; because the methods are easy and many, for a wise man to avoid a quarrel with honour, or engage in it with innocence. And I can discover no political evil in suffering bullies, sharpers, and rakes to rid the world of each other by a method of their own, where the law hath not been able to find an expedient.
Page 61 - From seven years of age till thirty he never grew taller; but after thirty he shot up to three feet nine inches, and there fixed. Jeffery became a considerable part of the entertainment of the court. Sir William Davenant wrote a poem called " Jeffreidos," on a battle between him and a turkey-cock ;* and in 1638 was published a very small book, called
Page 61 - He probably did not long remain in slavery ; for at the beginning of the civil war he was made a captain in the royal army, and in 1644 attended the queen to France, where he remained till the Restoration. At last, upon suspicion of his being privy to the Popish plot, he was taken up in 1682, and confined in the gate-house, Westminster, where he ended his life, in the sixty-third year of his age.
Page 249 - THE dawn is overcast, the morning low'rs, And heavily in clouds brings on the day, The great, th...

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