A Plea for the Antiquity of Heraldry: With an Attempt to Expound Its Theory and Elucidate Its History (Google eBook)

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J.R. Smith, 1853 - Heraldry - 23 pages
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Page 8 - ... attention. As, for instance, the Porcii took their name from their occupation as swine-herds ; the Ovini from their care of sheep ; the Caprilli, of goats ; the Equarii, of horses ; the Tauri, of bulls, &c. We may conclude, therefore, that the family of this Marcus Vaccula were originally cowkeepers, and that the figures of cows so plentifully impressed on all the articles which he presented to the baths, are a sort of canting arms, to borrow an expression from heraldry, as in Rome the family...
Page 8 - Varro, in his book upon rural affairs, tells us that many of the surnames of the Roman families had their origin in pastoral life ; and especially are derived from the animals to whose breeding they paid most attention. As, for instance, the Porcii took their name from their occupation as swine-herds ; the Ovini from their care of sheep ; the Caprilli, of goats ; the Equarii, of horses ; the Tauri, of bulls, &c. We may conclude, therefore, that the family of this Marcus...
Page 1 - A PLEA FOR THE ANTIQUITY OF HERALDRY, with an Attempt to Expound its Theory and Elucidate its History. By W. Smith Ellis, Esq., of the Middle Temple. 8vo, sewed, Is.
Page 11 - ... wolf issuing from a cave, a cradle under a tree, with a child, guarded by a goat, and...
Page 23 - ... interesting appendix, illustrating the causes and modes of change in coat armour at early periods. But unfortunately for the doctrines enunciated in the body of the work, the heraldic genealogy of the Cobham family there given, completely contradicts them, and supports the views advanced in this essay.
Page 23 - The arms there given were borne (though not so stated), it will appear, from critical examination of the document, assisted by a reference to the Kentish historians, at tJie time of the Conquest, and for sev eral generations afterwards unchanged.
Page 12 - Lancaster, may account for the frequency of the rose in the arms of Cornish families.

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