The poetry of the Codex Vercellensis: The legend of St. Andrew (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Mitchell Kemble
Ælfric Society, 1843 - English poetry
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - And Solomon told her all her questions : there was not anything hid from the king, which he told her not.
Page 321 - And then your grace need not make any doubt But in twenty-four hours you'll ride it about. The king he laughed, and swore by St. Jone, I did not think it could be gone so soone ! — Now from the third question thou must not shrinke, But tell me here truly what I do thinke.
Page 10 - And she came to Jerusalem with a very great train, with camels that bare spices, and very much gold, and precious stones : and when she was come to Solomon, she communed with him of all that was in her heart.
Page 11 - The son of a woman of the daughters of Dan, and his father was a man of Tyre, -skilful to work in gold, and in silver, in brass, in iron, in stone, and in timber, in purple, in blue, and in fine linen, and in crimson; -Also to grave any manner of graving, and to find out every device which shall be put to him, with thy cunning men, and with the cunning men of my lord David thy father.
Page 34 - Mariemontani," to which was appended the Marcolphus, with, if I remember rightly, the same title which it bore in the later editions, viz. " Marcolphus. Disputationes, quas dicuntur habuisse inter se mutuo Rex Salomon sapientissimus, et Marcolphus facie deformis et turpissimus, tamen ut fertur, eloquentissimus : latinitate donate, et mme primum animi et salsi leporis gratia, editae.
Page 107 - Domino nostro Jesu Christo: qui cum Patre et Spiritu Sancto vivit et regnat Deus, per omnia saecula saeculorum.
Page x - It is in fact in their poems that the stubborn nationality of our forefathers shows itself most thoroughly : their prose works are almost always literal translations, and even if original, are deeply imbued with tramontane feelings, derived from the models most in vogue. But the epic forms maintained themselves despite of the book-learning which was so overprized: and even translations became originals, from the all-pervading Teutonic spirit which was unconsciously preserved in the forms and phrases...
Page 220 - Thise beenmilke, hony, oyll, and wyne. C. Wherefore is the son rede at even ? M. For he gothe toward hell. C. Who made first cities ? M. Marcurius the gyaunt. C. How many langagis been there? M. Ixij., and so many discipules had God without his appostoles.
Page 217 - ... Canaan lived ix. cx wynter. And that Canaan had a son than hight Malek, and that Malek lived ix. c. and v. wynter, and that Malek had a son that hight Jared, and that Jared lived ix. c. xlij. wynter, and that Jared had a son that hight Matusidall, and that Matusidall lived ix. c. and xlix.
Page 73 - Then was the saint in the shadow of darkness, warrior hard of courage, the whole night long with various thoughts beset ; snow bound the earth with winter-casts ; cold grew the storms, with hard hail-showers ; and rime and frost, the hoary warriors, locked up the dwellings of men, the settlements of the people ; frozen were the lands with cold icicles, shrunk the water's might ; over the river streams, the ice made a bridge, a pale water road.

Bibliographic information