The Indians' Book: An Offering by the American Indians of Indian Lore, Musical and Narrative, to Form a Record of the Songs and Legends of Their Race

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Courier Dover Publications, 1923 - Music - 584 pages
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A book created wholly by the American Indian - songs, myths, drawings and decorations based on traditional designs - "The Indians' Book" is a treasury of lore for general readers, for folk singers. Its musical and folk material derives directly from the Indian oral tradition and is presented exactly as Miss Curtis recorded it.
  

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My great Grandmothers name was White Star she was indian and i know next to nothing of her other than a description from my father and if anyone can tell me more about her or her tribe please write me @ WookieLuv0nMarz@yahoo.com

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The Indians' Book by Natalie Curtis (1994) Read full review

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Contents

EASTERN INDIANS
1
PLAINS INDIANS
31
LAKE INDIANS
241
SOUTHWESTERN INDIANS
311
PUEBLO INDIANS
423
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Page x - There are birds of many colors— red, blue, green, yellow, Yet it is all one bird. There are horses of many colors— brown, black, yellow, white, Yet it is all one horse. So cattle, so all living things, animals, flowers, trees. So men in this land, where once were only Indians, are now men of many colors— white, black, yellow, red.
Page xxv - Such poetry is impressionistic, and many may be the interpretations of the same song given by different singers. Again, where the songs belong to sacred ceremonies or to secret societies, the meaning is purposely hidden — a holy mystery enshrined — that only the initiated may hear and understand.
Page viii - There are horses of many colors — brown, black, yellow, white — yet it is all one horse. So cattle, so all living things — animals, flowers, trees. So men: in this land where once were only Indians are now men of every color — white, black, yellow, red — yet all one people. That this should come to pass was in the heart of the Great Mystery. It is right thus. And everywhere there shall be peace.2* So Hiamove said, more than fifty years ago.

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