Frondes Agrestes: Readings in 'Modern Painters,' Chosen at Her Pleasures (Google eBook)

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Wiley, 1875 - 137 pages
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Page 111 - One lesson, shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shows, and what conceals Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.
Page 86 - For he is the Lord our God : and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand.
Page 34 - Who saw the narrow sunbeam that came out of the south and smote upon their summits until they melted and mouldered away in a dust of blue rain? Who saw the dance of the dead clouds when the sunlight left them last night, and the west wind blew them before it like withered leaves?
Page 34 - Who saw the dance of the dead clouds where the sunlight left them last night, and the west wind blew them before it like withered leaves? All has passed unregretted as unseen; or if the apathy be ever shaken off even for an instant, it is only by what is gross, or what is extraordinary. And yet it is not in the broad and fierce manifestations of the elemental energies, nor in the clash of the hail, nor the drift of the whirlwind, that the highest characters of the sublime are developed. God is not...
Page 109 - The first thing which I remember as an event in life, was being taken by my nurse to the brow of Friar's Crag on Derwentwater; the intense joy, mingled with awe, that I had in looking through the hollows in the mossy roots, over the crag, into the dark lake, has associated itself more or less with all twining roots of trees ever since.
Page 33 - The noblest scenes of the earth can be seen and known but by few ; it is not intended that man should live always in the midst of them ; he injures them by his presence, he ceases to feel them if he be always with them ; but the sky is for all ; bright as it is, it is not "too bright nor good, for human nature's daily food...
Page 46 - The hills melted like wax at the presence of the Lord, at the presence of the Lord of the whole earth.
Page 127 - Perhaps there is no more impressive scene on earth than the solitary extent of the Campagna of Rome under evening light. Let the reader imagine himself for a moment withdrawn from the sounds and motion of the living world, and sent forth alone into this wild and wasted plain. The earth yields and crumbles beneath his foot, tread he never so lightly, for its substance is white, hollow, and carious, like the dusty wreck of the bones of men. The long knotted grass waves and tosses feebly in...
Page 104 - Unfading as motionless, the worm frets them not, and the autumn wastes not. Strong in lowliness, they neither blanch in heat nor pine in frost. To them, slow-fingered, constant-hearted, is entrusted the weaving of the dark eternal tapestries of the hills ; to them, slow-pencilled, iris-dyed, the tender framing of their endless imagery.
Page 52 - Of all inorganic substances, acting in their own proper nature, and without assistance or combination, water is the most wonderful. If we think of it as the source of all the changefulness and beauty which we have seen in clouds then, as the instrument by which the earth we have contemplated was modelled into symmetry, and its crags chiselled into grace ; -then, as in the form of snow, it robes the mountains it has made with that transcendent light which we could...

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