The new universal letterwriter: containing letters on different subjects (Google eBook)

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Page 63 - He that walketh with wise men shall be wise: but a companion of fools shall be destroyed.
Page 87 - Be studious in your profession, and you will be learned. Be industrious and frugal, and you will be rich. Be sober and temperate, and you will be healthy. Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy. At least, you will, by such conduct, stand the best chance for such consequences.
Page 41 - But whatever may have been the cause, I am entirely innocent ; and to convince you of my sincerity, beg that the day of marriage may be next week. My affections never so much as...
Page 23 - Nay, so far is she from having any objections, that she would have waited on you as the bearer of this, had I not persuaded her against it, as she has been these three days afflicted with a severe cold, and I was afraid that if she had ventured abroad so soon, it might be attended with dangerous consequences.
Page 21 - I received your letter last night, and as it was on a subject I had not yet any thoughts of, you will not wonder when I tell you I was a good deal surprised. Although I have seen and familiarly conversed with you at different times, yet I had not the most distant thoughts of your making proposals of such a nature. Some of your sex have often...
Page 37 - I will not go to any tavern, but as soon as my work is done, return to my dearly beloved Sally. I hope my dear, you will not be angry, for I am really in love. I cannot be happy unless you are mine. I was afraid to mention this to you, but if you will leave an answer at my lodgings, I will meet you next Sunday after dinner, at the , when we will take a walk to and drink tea.
Page 19 - ... in the greatest difficulty, if not ruin. Let me beg, therefore, that when you become a master, you will avoid mixing in company with those who spend their time and substance in the fashionable follies of the present age.
Page 26 - I repent calling you mother. I was going to say that you had known but few pleasures in this life to be deprived of your husband so soon, and the rest of your life spent under so many infirmities. But your letter convinces me, that you have felt more real pleasure in the practice of virtue and resignation to the divine will, than ever can be had in any, nay, even the greatest temporal enjoyments.
Page 11 - I freely confess it ; but, with great sincerity, I must at the same time declare, that they were written in a careless manner, without considering the character of the person to whom they were addressed. I am fully sensible of my error, and on all future occasions shall endeavor to avoid giving the least offence.
Page 3 - Those, who are accomplished in it, are too happy in their own knowledge to need farther information concerning its excellence. And such as are unqualified to convey their sentiments to a friend, without the assistance of a third person, feel their deficiency so severely, that nothing need be said to convince them, that it is their interest to become acquainted with what is so necessary and agreeable. Had letters been known at the beginning of the world, epistolary writing would have...

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