Imagining India: The Idea of a Renewed Nation (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Mar 19, 2009 - Business & Economics - 528 pages
24 Reviews
A visionary look at the evolution and future of India

In this momentous book, Nandan Nilekani traces the central ideas that shaped India's past and present and asks the key question of the future: How will India as a global power avoid the mistakes of earlier development models? As a co-founder of Infosys, a global leader in information technology, Nilekani has actively participated in the company's rise during the past twenty-seven years. In Imagining India, he uses his global experience and understanding to discuss the future of India and its role as a global citizen and emerging economic giant. Nilekani engages with India's particular obstacles and opportunities, charting a new way forward for the young nation.




  

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Review: Imagining India: The Idea of a Renewed Nation

User Review  - Stephen Brody - Goodreads

Imagining India as yet another of the United States, full of loud-talking parvenus and peasants playing the stock market on smartphones. Bangalore, which in its modern form seems to have been invented ... Read full review

Review: Imagining India: The Idea of a Renewed Nation

User Review  - Ipsita Dasgupta - Goodreads

This is rediscovering India - complete with a dash of wit, humour and entrepreneurial outlook - all in the perfect amount. Nilekani leaves you falling in love with the country. Apart from being a ... Read full review

Contents

Faster and faster
Moving cracks
Paths to growth
Border crossings
The quarrels within
Our left and right
A country without a revolution
Shut out and angry

The time is now
Open to our possibilities
Millions on an anthill
Snip snip
Different demographic destinies
From albatross to advantage
The dividends of an autocracy versus a democracy
Indias destiny
The camel in our demographics
Before sunset
A young turbulent people
Our changing impressions
Capitalism as a nasty word
The hopes of the Bombay Plan
Then I and you and all of us fell down
Indian business comes in from the cold
A flurry of activity
The Bombay House businesses
From the Bombay Plan to the Bombay Club to Bombay House
A language of the ships and traders
A tool for Indian nationalism
A symbol of colonialism
English the southern states and the Dalits
The invisible career tongue
The language of upward mobility
Rising from below
The global opportunity
An Indian tongue
The early years
The 1980s
A new role for information technology
The rise of information technology in Indian banking
Building new systems
Elections and railways
2000 and on
The death of the gatekeeper
It is never going to happen
Leading the way
Information technology in the new Indian landscape
Lost glories
A free nation that turned its back on globalization
After first light
Our triple plays
The luckiest country of the twentyfirst century
Quid pro quo
The biggest untapped resource?
Our peculiar challenges
India within
The unexpected country
Building toward a democracy
The monolithic state
The ground heaving upward
Our new polycentric state
Our new freedoms and discontents
Barbarians at the gates
From khadi to silks
The Britisheducated Indian
Forgotten ambitions
The disappearing middle
Different strokes
New demands and changing choices
Moving out into private schools
New dreams and schemes
The possibilities of literacy
Blowing in the wind
A tale of two cities
Nehru dreams
The city slickers have left town
Invisible men
Our unintended cities
The urban facelift
A change in attitudes
Our urban consciousness
Urban legends
All roads lead to the Empire
Out of focus
The lay of the land
Slow steps
Untying the knots
Turning points and missing pieces
Gathering steam
The horse before the cart
Groping toward answers
No easy choices
A poor unconnected economy
Labyrinths of taxes
Our regional imbalances
A house of cards
Breaking borders
The worm turns
One ring to rule them all
Leaving behind a halfdone reform process
The urgency of now
Topdown or bottomup?
In favor always of more freedom
Shaping a movement
In the shadow of the state
No longer the protector
The need for growth
Moving the goalposts?
The pressures of growth
Our Indian solutions
A persistent legacy
Tinkering with policies
An immobile colossus
Our bunkered institutions
Our choices for change
The democratic sense of our universities
A hole in the wall
Beneath the surface
Single citizen ID
Distribution channels
From subsidies to direct benefits
Efficient program design
Contested lands
Creating national information utilities
Anticipating our challenges
A transformational force
A dual challenge
The peculiar habits of the people
A loss of vision
Much worse before it got better
The reluctant state
A space for inventiveness
Testing new solutions
Running against a clock
A chance to redefine our health space
Our culture of the elders
Inside and outside a charmed circle
Change in the air?
Our ageold notions of security
Our great big growth advantage
A chance to set the bar
A great blueprint
A new momentum?
The gathering clouds
Environmental factions
A moody kind of weather
An outcast in times of growth
The unquiet country
Our early chances
Silver linings
A very local crisis
Laws versus realities
A new math for the economy
Adapting to change
Our environmental future
A changing template
An early search for alternatives
In the heart of the theater for oil
Mainstreaming our energy policy
Pushing for cleaner cheaper better solutions
Counting pennies and cents
Importing inefficiencies
Renewable energy
A fairer better answer
Flipping our weaknesses over
Where the power lies
NOTES FROM AN ACCIDENTAL ENTREPRENEUR
THE ENTREPRENEUR IN INDIA
THE RISE FALL AND RISE OF ENGLISH
FROM MANEATERS TO ENABLERS
THE DEEPENING OF OUR DEMOCRACY
THE CHALLENGES IN INDIAS CLASSROOMS
INDIA IN THE CITY
THE LONG ROADS HOME
OUR EMERGING SINGLE MARKET
OUR BIGGEST FIGHTS
JOSTLING FOR JOBS
OUR UNIVERSITIES
FROM BANGALORE ONE TO COUNTRY ONE
THE MISSING DEMOGRAPHIC
INDIAS ENVIRONMENT CHALLENGE
The seeds
Baby steps
A hopeful but tenuous country
The locusts decades
Uprisings
New opportunities and fractures
A new impatience
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About the author (2009)

Thomas L. Friedman has won the Pulitzer Prize three times for his work at "The New York Times. "He is the author of two other bestselling books, From Beirut to Jerusalem," "winner of the National Book Award, and The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization,"" He lives in Bethesda, Maryland, with his family.

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