The Kingdom of Swaziland: Studies in Political History (Google eBook)

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1999 - History - 204 pages
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A scholarly and engaging study, this history of Swaziland, by an author who spent many years in the kingdom, presents a vivid account of the interplay of politics and personalities along the passage to post-colonial independence. From the early stages of Swazi occupation of the present-day kingdom to the accession of Sobhuza II as king in 1921, this book traces problems in consolidating leadership under the Dlamini chieftaincy and examines the infuence of Boer and British settlers, and of mining and commercial interests, on Swazi culture and governance. It recounts the story of a thriving small nation that sought to maintain traditional customs and institutions in the face of a powerful European presence.

Each of the sixteen chapters concentrates on an aspect of political history that has influenced the character of the present-day kingdom, and much of the material, especially after 1900, has not been utilized in previous studies. The introduction looks at Swazi experience in a contemporary context, evaluating historic forces that have made for stability in a rapidly changing world. Other sections detail the Swazi reaction to European-controlled neighboring states (the Transvaal, Natal, and Mozambique), the tensions introduced by successive Boer and British policies, the Swazi detachment during two external wars (1899-1902 and 1914-1918), and widespread concerns about colonialism and self-governance following World War I.

  

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Contents

V
9
VI
19
VII
29
VIII
37
IX
47
X
57
XI
69
XII
79
XVI
121
XVII
131
XVIII
141
XIX
151
XX
163
XXI
173
XXII
175
XXIII
193

XIII
89
XIV
101
XV
111
XXIV
195
XXV
197
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Page 9 - ... should be spared ; on which Nonha, in a mournful voice, replied, " They are killing us now." Had another long conversation with Umkolwani, who is an inferior chief among the Unguani, the substance of which I shall now relate : They belong to a tribe called Unguani, situated, as far as I could collect, to the NNE of Unkunginglove, at a distance of nine days

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