Journal of the House of Representatives of the ... General Assembly of the State of Ohio ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1848
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 49 - He shall take the chair every day precisely at the hour to which the House shall have adjourned on the preceding day ; shall immediately call the members to order ; and, on the appearance of a quorum,* shall cause the Journal of the preceding day to be read.
Page 247 - That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be requested to use their influence to...
Page 51 - After a motion is stated by the Speaker, or read by the Clerk, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the House, but may be withdrawn at any time before a decision or amendment.
Page 219 - The same gentleman moved to amend the same by striking out all after the word "Resolved...
Page 2 - JUSTICE. *THE first maxim of a free state is, that the laws be made by one set of men, and administered by another : in other words, that the legislative and judicial characters be kept separate. When these offices are united in the same person or assembly, particular laws are made for particular cases, springing oftentimes from partial motives, and directed to private ends : whilst they are kept separate, general laws are made by one body of men, without foreseeing whom they May affect; and, when...
Page 56 - Ballots voted for any person whose name does not appear on the machine as a nominated candidate for office are herein referred to as independent ballots.
Page 197 - That the Senators and Representatives of this state in the Congress of the United States...
Page 581 - That his Excellency, the Governor, be, and he is hereby, requested...
Page 54 - In forming a committee of the whole house, the speaker shall leave his chair, and a chairman, to preside in committee, shall be appointed by the speaker.
Page 344 - In the third place, we must consider that nothing is more dangerous than to unite two persons so closely in all their interests and concerns, as man and wife, without rendering the union entire and total. The least possibility of a separate interest must be the source of endless quarrels and suspicions. The wife, not secure of her establishment, will still be driving some separate end or project; and the husband's selfishness, being accompanied with more power, may be still more dangerous.

Bibliographic information