The Emerging Mind: The BBC Reith Lectures 2003

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Profile Books Limited, 2003 - Psychology - 208 pages
8 Reviews
A scintillating introduction to the latest thinking on the brain and the mind by the world's leading expert. Neuroscience can now begin to unlock the key to the self. Our knowledge of the brain has progressed so rapidly that it will change the way we think of ourselves as human beings. It will change our notion of understanding. This is a revolution which will have impact on all our lives. Neuroscientists are gathering new empirical evidence about consciousness and human nature; they are picking up where the great earlier thinkers like Freud, Darwin, Charcot and others began. This evidence begins to give substance to some of the grand statements and intuitive leaps made in the nineteenth and early twentieth century about the nature of the self.

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Review: The Emerging Mind: Reith lectures 2003

User Review  - Shaun - Goodreads

Based on his 2003 Reith Lectures, The Emerging Mind is a introduction to the wonders of neuroscience - where it is and where it may eventually lead. Ramachandran starts by explaining the importance of ... Read full review

Review: The Emerging Mind: Reith lectures 2003

User Review  - Sameer m - Goodreads

intricacies of human brain described eloquently to layman level ...!! great book...!! Read full review

About the author (2003)

Vilayanur S. Ramachandran is Director of the Centre for the Brain at the University of California, San Diego. He has a PhD from Cambridge and many honours and awards including a fellowship from All Souls College, Oxford and a Gold medal from the Australian National University. Dr Ramachandran lectures widely on art, visual perception and the brain. He has published over 120 papers in scientific journals, is Editor-in-chief of the Encyclopaedia of Human Behaviour, the Encyclopaedia of the Human Brain and author of the critically acclaimed Phantoms in the Brain, which was the basis for a two part series on Channel Four TV. Newsweek recently named him a member of 'the century club' one of the 'hundred most prominent people to watch in the next century.'

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