The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 89, Part 2 (Google eBook)

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Edw. Cave, 1736-[1868], 1819 - Literature
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Page 367 - And whereas the Senate of the United States have approved of the said arrangement and recommended that it should be carried into effect, the same having also received the sanction of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, acting in the name and on the behalf of His...
Page 53 - ... in the conflicts of duty and passion, or the strife of contending duties; what sort of loves and enmities theirs were; how their griefs were tempered, and their full-swoln joys abated: how much of Shakspeare shines in the great men his contemporaries, and how far in his divine mind and manners he surpassed them and all mankind.
Page 472 - He never appeared, therefore, to be at all encumbered or perplexed with the verbiage of the dull books he perused, or the idle talk to which he listened ; but to have at once extracted, by a kind of intellectual alchemy, all that was worthy of attention, and to have reduced it, for his own use, to its true value and to its simplest form. And thus it often happened that a great deal more was learned from his brief and vigorous account of the theories and arguments of tedious writers, than an ordinary...
Page 112 - When at a play to laugh, or cry, Yet cannot tell the reason why; Never to hold her tongue a minute, While all she prates has nothing in it ; Whole hours can with a coxcomb sit, And take his nonsense all for wit ; Her learning mounts to read a song, But half the words pronouncing wrong ; • Has every repartee in store She spoke ten thousand times before...
Page 58 - and attentively read these Holy Scriptures, and am of opinion that this " Volume, independently of its divine origin, contains more true sublimity, ' more exquisite beauty, more pure morality, more important history, and * finer strains both of Poetry and Eloquence, than can be' collected from * all other books, in whatever age or language they may have been composed.
Page 250 - His muse, bright angel of his verse, Gives balm for all the thorns that pierce, For all the pangs that rage; Blest light, still gaining on the gloom, The more than Michal of his bloom, The Abishag of his age.
Page 250 - Abishag of his age. He sang of God — the mighty source Of all things — the stupendous force On which all strength depends; From Whose right arm, beneath Whose eyes, All period, power, and enterprise Commences, reigns, and ends.
Page 112 - In men we various ruling passions find ; In women two almost divide the kind ; Those only fix'd, they first or last obey, The love of pleasure, and the love of sway.
Page 471 - But these are poor and narrow views of its importance. It has increased indefinitely the mass of human comforts and enjoyments, and rendered cheap and accessible, all over the world, the materials of wealth and prosperity.
Page 112 - twill pass for wit; Care not for feeling — pass your proper jest, And stand a critic, hated yet caress'd. And shall we own such judgment? no— as soon Seek roses in December— ice in June; Hope constancy in wind, or corn in chaff; Believe a woman or an epitaph, Or any other thing that's false, before You trust in critics, who themselves are sore Or yield one single thought to be misled By Jeffrey's heart, or Lambe's Boeotian head.

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