The world within war: America's combat experience in World War II

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Free Press, 1997 - History - 408 pages
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Historian Gerald Linderman has created a seamless and highly original social history, authoritatively recovering and capturing the full experience of combat in World War II. Based on a vast array of letters, diaries, books, and a survey of veterans by the Army War College, "The World Within War" cuts through the many layers of protective shielding in soldiers' memoirs to find the shards of direct experiences that lie beneath. The Allied-Axis conflict was far more complex than even the Great War, and much has been made by previous historians of the differences between the European theater and the grimly barbaric Pacific. Yet Linderman demonstrates that there were more similarities than differences, that for American soldiers around the globe the war was disintegrative. Examining how Americans prepared for battle, how they treated each other, how they conceived of the enemy, how they thought of home, and how they reacted to battle itself, Linderman argues that ultimately, in both theaters, combat had its own grim logic, independent of causes and countries, flags and commanders.

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The world within war: America's combat experience in World War II

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Many works seek to explain why soldiers fight as they do, but this one stands out. Historian Linderman explores the social and psychological forces working on America's citizen-soldiers when they ... Read full review

Review: The World Within War: America's Combat Experience in World War II

User Review  - Josh Stewart - Goodreads

Excellent book! It is a collection of letters and memoirs from WWII combat soldiers. It is graphic in parts as the author doesn't edit any of these letters or memoirs. He presents the actual primary ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Coping with Combat
48
The War of Rules
90
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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