Africa and the American flag (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton & Co., 1854 - Africa, West - 390 pages
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Page 227 - But the circumstance which struck us most forcibly was, how it was possible for such a number of human beings to exist, packed up and wedged together as tight as they could cram, in low cells, three feet high, the greater part of which, except that immediately under the grated hatchways...
Page 226 - The slaves were all enclosed under grated hatchways, between decks. The space was so low, that they sat between each other's legs, and stowed so close together, that there was no possibility of their lying down, or at all changing their position, by night or day. As they belonged to, and were shipped on account of different individuals, they were all branded, like sheep, with the owners...
Page 227 - Over the hatchway stood a ferociouslooking fellow, with a scourge of many twisted thongs in his hand, who was the slave-driver of the ship, and whenever he heard the slightest noise below, he shook it over them, and seemed eager to exercise it.
Page 245 - ... must have been the sufferings of these poor wretches when the hatches were closed ? I am informed that very often in these cases, the stronger will strangle the weaker; and this was probably the reason why so many died, or rather were found dead, the morning after the capture. None but an eye witness can form a conception of the horrors these poor creatures must endure in their transit across the ocean. I regret to say that most of this misery is produced by our own countrymen; they furnish the...
Page 227 - ... visages brightened up. They perceived something of sympathy and kindness in our looks which they had not been accustomed to, and feeling instinctively that we were friends, they immediately began to shout and clap their hands. One or two had picked up a few Portuguese words and cried out, "Viva! Viva!
Page 226 - She had taken in, on the coast of Africa, 336 males, and 226 females, making in all 562, and had been out seventeen days, during which she had thrown overboard fifty-five. The slaves were all enclosed under grated hatchways, between decks. The space was so low, that they sat between each other's legs, and stowed so close together, that there...
Page 227 - As soon as the poor creatures saw us looking down at them, their dark and melancholy visages brightened up. They perceived something of sympathy and kindness in our looks, which they had not been accustomed to; and feeling instinctively that we were friends, they immediately began to shout and clap their hands. One or two had picked up a few Portuguese words, and cried out, Yiva!
Page 230 - After much deliberation, this wretched vessel was allowed to proceed on her voyage. " It was dark when we separated ; and the last parting sounds we heard from the unhallowed ship were the cries and shrieks of the slaves, suffering under some bodily infliction...
Page 395 - ... in production with low prices. Under the impression that a chronological issue of the Poets would not be so acceptable as one more diversified, it has been deemed advisable to intermix the earlier and the later Poets. Care, however, will be taken that either the author or the volumes are in themselves complete, as published ; so that no purchaser discontinuing the series at any time...
Page 287 - York, registered on her stern. The Perry had no colore flying. The ship, when in range of the guns, hoisted the American ensign, shortened sail, and backed her maintop-sail. The first lieutenant, Mr. Rush, was sent to board her. As he was rounding her stern, the people on board observed, by the uniform of the boarding-officer, that the vessel was an American cruiser.

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