Journal of the Polynesian Society, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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1894
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Page 228 - Achilles cover'd with their fat the dead, And the piled victims round the body spread; Then jars of honey, and of fragrant oil, Suspends around, low-bending o'er the pile. Four sprightly coursers, with a deadly groan Pour forth their lives, and on the pyre are thrown.
Page 177 - What earthly /king has been notoriously vicious?" Men responded, "His name is Owaia, an impious man, devoid of skill in divination or in war, indifferent to the prosperity of the realms and the happiness of his subjects. His every thought is absorbed in sensual pleasure, and the gratification of his avarice. He exalts himself by trampling on his subjects, whose felicity he of course fails to consult, in a word, he pays no regard to the counsels and example of his excellent father." Then said...
Page 228 - As a poor father, helpless and undone, Mourns o'er the ashes of an only son, Takes a sad pleasure the last bones to burn, And...
Page 85 - They were large enough to carry sixty to seventy people, and were propelled by paddles (hiwa), which, contrary to the method of all other Polynesians, were used by the crews sitting with their backs to the bows, as with Europeans, and by making use of a support, or thole-pin, against which the paddle worked.
Page 160 - At the building of this hale (Maori, whare) Mr. Chamberlain writes, ' At the setting of every post, and the placing of every rafter, and at the thatching of every wa (or intervening space) a human sacrifice had been offered.' Human sacrifices had also been offered for each chief whose remains were deposited there at each stage of the consecration viz., at the removal of the flesh, at the putting-up of the bones, at the putting-on of the tapa (native cloth), at the winding-on of the sennit,...
Page 142 - ... the relieving segment arch above the lintel. A bressummer may be termed a large lintel; and by its adoption here, at least, the support of the masonry is truly intended. The use of the bressummer, in shopfront openings, is an evil necessity to which an architect must often submit ; and all that he can do, is to make the best of a bad job, by wrought-iron trussing, which will at least give adequate strength, though it may not insure permanent durability. If time spare it, fire may destroy it ;...
Page 156 - This saying is applied to the world. Its meaning is: If the basket had not been placed as a support for the pillar, the earth would have moved to and fro over the surface of the waters, and would have sunk therein; there would have been no resting place for the being called man, or anything else, or for anything which lives. When the overwhelming earthquake comes, the pillar is there in the basket; however great the quaking, the pillar is firm. By means of the...
Page 154 - ... proclamation and took possession of the island in the name of the Hawaiian Government. The island is a large lava rock, and was formerly inhabited, as there are square walls about 3 feet high, 4 feet wide, and from 30 to 40 feet long; on the top of which are large flat stones standing on end and set about 2 feet apart. It was first thought that some shipwrecked crew had made a landing here. After a search, however, nothing could be found to indicate that such was the case. Captain Freeman found...
Page 10 - All evils flow even from eternity ; hence the chant of eternity says : From eternity came the universe, From the universe the bright clear light, From the bright clear light the enduring light, From the enduring light the void unattainable, From the void unattainable the void intangible, From the void intangible the void unstable, From the void unstable the void (endowed with) paternity, From which came moisture, which combining with limitless thought, Produced the visible Heavens, The source...
Page 31 - Nana i uohoia te ihu o Tainui, Te waka o Hoturoa, nana i homai ko te kai ki te ao Maori He aha te atua korero i mana mai ai, Me huri kau ake ki muri ki to tua, Matahi noa ana ko era mahihi anake Takoto ana mai ta...

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