The works of Thomas Moore, comprehending all his melodies, ballads, etc, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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1823
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Page 78 - Sirs, ye know that by this craft we have our wealth ; moreover, ye see and hear, that not alone at Ephesus, but almost throughout all Asia, this Paul hath persuaded and turned away much people, saying, that they be no gods which are made with hands. So that not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought...
Page 12 - All the penal laws of that unparalleled code of oppression, which were made after the last event, were manifestly the effects of national hatred and scorn towards a conquered people ; whom the victors delighted to trample upon, and were not at all afraid to provoke. They were not the effect of their fears but of their security. They who carried on this system, looked to the irresistible force of Great Britain for their support in their acts of power.
Page 12 - The new English interest was settled with as solid a stability as anything in human affairs can look for. All the penal laws of that unparalleled code of oppression, which were made after the last event, were manifestly the effects of national hatred and scorn towards a conquered people ; whom the victors delighted to trample upon, and were not at all afraid to provoke.
Page 52 - The boundaries on both sides are fixed and immovable. He jumbles heaven and earth together, the things most remote and opposite, who mixes these two societies, which are in their original, end, business, and in everything perfectly distinct and infinitely different from each other.
Page 51 - Yes, — rather plunge me back in Pagan night And take my chance with Socrates for bliss., Than be the Christian of a faith like this, Which builds on heavenly cant its earthly sway, And in a convert mourns to lose a prey...
Page 173 - To sigh, yet feel no pain, To weep, yet scarce know why ; To sport an hour with Beauty's chain, Then throw it idly by ; — To kneel at many a shrine, Yet lay the heart on none ; To think all other charms divine, But those we just have won ;— This is love— careless love — Such as kindleth hearts that rove. To keep one sacred flame Through life, unchill'd...
Page 187 - Oh! oh! Orator Puff! One voice for one orator's surely enough. But he still talked away, spite of coughs and of frowns, So distracting all ears with his ups and his downs, That a wag once, on hearing the orator say My voice is for war, ask'd him, which of them, pray ? Oh ! oh ! &c.
Page 187 - One voice for one orator's surely enough. But he still talked away spite of coughs and of frowns, So distracting all ears with his ups and his downs, That a wag once, on hearing the orator say, " My voice is for war," ask'd him, " Which of them pray ?
Page 73 - But light, heat, whiteness, *C9»4 or coldness, are no more really in them than sickness or pain is in manna. Take away the sensation of them; let not the...
Page 53 - They attacked Montague, one of the king's chaplains, on account of a moderate book, which he had lately composed, and which, to their great disgust, saved virtuous catholics, as well as other Christians, from eternal torments.

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