Imperfect Justice: Looted Assets, Slave Labor, and the Unfinished Business of World War II (Google eBook)

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PublicAffairs, Aug 5, 2009 - History - 432 pages
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In the second half of the 1990s, Stuart Eizenstat was perhaps the most controversial U.S. foreign policy official in Europe. His mission had nothing to do with Russia, the Middle East, Yugoslavia, or any of the other hotspots of the day. Rather, Eizenstat's mission was to provide justice—albeit belated and imperfect justice—for the victims of World War II.

Imperfect Justice is Eizenstat's account of how the Holocaust became a political and diplomatic battleground fifty years after the war's end, as the issues of dormant bank accounts, slave labor, confiscated property, looted art, and unpaid insurance policies convulsed Europe and America. He recounts the often heated negotiations with the Swiss, the Germans, the French, the Austrians, and various Jewish organizations, showing how these moral issues, shunted aside for so long, exposed wounds that had never healed and conflicts that had never been properly resolved. Though we will all continue to reckon with the crimes of World War II for a long time to come, Eizenstat's account shows that it is still possible to take positive steps in the service of justice.
  

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Imperfect justice: looted assets, slave labor, and the unfinished business of World War II

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Eizenstat, who was U.S. ambassador to the European Union under President Clinton, provides a clear and penetrating account of his personal involvement with the search for Holocaust restitution from ... Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
23
IV
46
V
52
VI
75
VII
90
VIII
115
IX
136
XIV
243
XV
259
XVI
279
XVII
293
XVIII
315
XIX
339
XX
357
XXI
373

X
165
XI
187
XII
205
XIII
229
XXII
381
XXIII
403
XXIV
405
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Page 11 - As matters now stand, we appear to be treating the Jews as the Nazis treated them except that we do not exterminate them.
Page 11 - Everyone believes that the displaced person is a human being, which he is not, and this applies particularly to the Jews who are lower than animals.

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About the author (2009)

Stuart E. Eizenstat served in several high-level positions in the State, Treasury, and Commerce Departments from 1993 to 2001. He is currently the head of international trade and finance at the law firm of Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C.

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