What's Wrong with the World

Front Cover
Echo Library, 2008 - Social Science - 132 pages
20 Reviews
British writer GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON (1874-1936) expounded prolifically about his wide-ranging philosophies-he is impossible to categorize as "liberal" or "conservative," for instance-across a wide variety of avenues: he was a literary critic, historian, playwright, novelist, columnist, and poet. This 1910 book is a unified work about all the broad array of worries that trouble the world, but it can be read in essaylike chunks. Discovering Chesterton's inimitable take on: . Wanted, an Unpractical Man . The Free Family . The Wildness of Domesticity . Oppression by Optimism . Wisdom and the Weather . The Unmilitary Suffragette . The Romance of Thrift . The Higher Anarchy . The Truth About Education . The Need for Narrowness . The Staleness of the New Schools . The Empire of the Insect An excellent introduction to the world of G.K. Chesteton, this is a volume as pertinent today as it was a century ago.

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Review: What's Wrong with the World

User Review  - Ann - Goodreads

Love GK Chesterton's wit and clarity of thought. In this collection of essays, I love PART III "Feminism, or the Mistake About Woman". I especially love his comments on the importance of "motherhood ... Read full review

Review: What's Wrong with the World

User Review  - Stephen - Goodreads

What's wrong with the world? Too many people are proposing answers to the wrong questions. What's Wrong is a curious collection of thoughts, voiced at the turn of the 20th century, in response to the ... Read full review

About the author (2008)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in London, England, in 1874. He began his education at St Paul's School, and later went on to study art at the Slade School, and literature at University College in London. Chesterton wrote a great deal of poetry, as well as works of social and literary criticism. Among his most notable books are The Man Who Was Thursday, a metaphysical thriller, and The Everlasting Man, a history of humankind's spiritual progress. After Chesterton converted to Catholicism in 1922, he wrote mainly on religious topics. Chesterton is most known for creating the famous priest-detective character Father Brown, who first appeared in "The Innocence of Father Brown." Chesterton died in 1936 at the age of 62.

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