The Prince and the Pauper: A Tale for Young People of All Ages (Google eBook)

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Harper & brothers, 1881 - 309 pages
23 Reviews
  

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Review: The Prince and the Pauper

User Review  - Steven - Goodreads

A couple things of import to note about this book are that it was published in 1881 (1882 in the US) and was Mark Twain's first attempt at historical fiction. This means that this story has to be ... Read full review

Review: The Prince and the Pauper

User Review  - Alexandra Swann - Goodreads

It's hard not to enjoy this fun story by Mark Twain that has been copied countless times. /This is the oft-retold story of a poor boy who trades place with an identical-looking pampered prince. The ... Read full review

Contents

I
xvii
II
ii
III
10
IV
20
V
26
VI
37
VII
48
VIII
54
XIX
170
XX
178
XXI
188
XXII
193
XXIII
204
XXIV
209
XXV
214
XXVI
225

IX
58
X
62
XI
75
XII
82
XIII
98
XIV
105
XV
122
XVI
138
XVII
143
XVIII
158
XXVII
231
XXVIII
245
XXIX
251
XXX
255
XXXI
259
XXXII
268
XXXIII
285
XXXIV
296
Copyright

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Page 140 - Queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic ; her face oblong, fair but wrinkled ; her eyes small, yet black and pleasant, her nose a little hooked ; her lips narrow, and her teeth black (a defect the English seem subject to, from their too great use of sugar...
Page 261 - Queen, as much as heart can think, Welcome again, as much as tongue can tell, Welcome to joyous tongues and hearts that will not shrink. God thee preserve, we pray, and wish thee ever well...
Page 306 - I yield thee most hearty thanks that thou hast given me life thus long, to finish this work to the glory of thy name!" That innocent and most exemplary life was drawing rapidly to its close, and in a few days he rendered up his spirit to his Creator, praying God to defend the realm from Papistry.
Page 139 - ... kneeled as the others had done, and placed what was brought upon the table, they too retired with the same ceremonies performed by the first. At last came an unmarried lady (we...
Page 77 - ... hanging by great bawdricks of gold. Next came yet another baron and another earl, in two long gowns of yellow satin, traversed with white satin, and in every bend of white was a bend of crimson satin, after the fashion of Russia, with furred hats of gray on their heads ; either of them having an hatchet in their hands, and boots with fykes" (points a foot long),
Page 302 - An agreement was at last made to continue the commerce between the states, even during war. It was not till the end of this reign that any salads, carrots, turnips, or other edible roots were produced in England.
Page 139 - First went gentlemen, barons, earls, knights of the garter, all richly dressed and bare-headed : next came the chancellor, bearing the seals in a red silk purse between two ; one of which carried the royal sceptre, the other the sword of state, in a red scabbard, studded with golden fleurs-de-lis, the point upwards...
Page xvii - IN the ancient city of London, on a certain autumn day in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, a boy was born to a poor family of the name of Canty, who did not want him.
Page 139 - A gentleman entered the room, bearing a rod, and along with him another, bearing a table-cloth, which, after they had both kneeled, three times, with the utmost veneration, he...
Page 302 - IT was not till the end of this reign [Henry VIII] that any salads, carrots, turnips, or other edible roots were produced in England. The little of these vegetables that was used was formerly imported from Holland and Flanders. Queen Catherine, when she wanted a salad, was obliged to despatch a messenger thither on purpose.

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